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Hearing Transcript on Examining Veterans' Employment Issues in Northeast Indiana

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EXAMINING VETERANS' EMPLOYMENT ISSUES IN NORTHEAST
INDIANA

 



 FIELD HEARING

BEFORE  THE

SUBCOMMITTEE ON ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY

OF THE

COMMITTEE ON VETERANS' AFFAIRS

U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

ONE HUNDRED TWELFTH CONGRESS

FIRST SESSION


OCTOBER 19, 2011

FIELD HEARING HELD IN FORT WAYNE, INDIANA


SERIAL No. 112-33


Printed for the use of the Committee on Veterans'
Affairs

 


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COMMITTEE ON VETERANS' AFFAIRS


JEFF MILLER, Florida, Chairman

 

CLIFF STEARNS, Florida

DOUG LAMBORN, Colorado

GUS M. BILIRAKIS, Florida

DAVID P. ROE, Tennessee

MARLIN A. STUTZMAN, Indiana

BILL FLORES, Texas

BILL JOHNSON, Ohio

JEFF DENHAM, California

JON RUNYAN, New Jersey

DAN BENISHEK, Michigan

ANN MARIE BUERKLE, New York

TIM HUELSKAMP, Kansas

MARK E. AMODEI, Nevada

ROBERT L. TURNER, New York

BOB FILNER, California, Ranking

CORRINE BROWN, Florida

SILVESTRE REYES, Texas

MICHAEL H. MICHAUD, Maine

LINDA T. SÁNCHEZ, California

BRUCE L. BRALEY, Iowa

JERRY MCNERNEY, California

JOE DONNELLY, Indiana

TIMOTHY J. WALZ, Minnesota

JOHN BARROW, Georgia

RUSS CARNAHAN, Missouri

 

 

 

Helen W. Tolar,
Staff Director and Chief Counsel


SUBCOMMITTEE ON ECONOMIC
OPPORTUNITY

MARLIN A. STUTZMAN, Indiana,
Chairman

GUS M. BILIRAKIS, Florida

BILL JOHNSON, Ohio

TIM HUELSKAMP, Kansas

MARK E. AMODEI, Nevada
BRUCE A. BRALEY, Iowa,
Ranking


LINDA T. SÁNCHEZ, California

TIMOTHY J. WALZ, Minnesota

Pursuant to clause 2(e)(4) of Rule XI of the Rules of the House,
public hearing records of the Committee on Veterans' Affairs are also
published in electronic form. The printed hearing record remains
the official version.
Because electronic submissions are used
to prepare both printed and electronic versions of the hearing record,
the process of converting between various electronic formats may
introduce unintentional errors or omissions. Such occurrences are
inherent in the current publication process and should diminish as the
process is further refined.

 

   

 

   

 

C O N T E N T S

October 19, 2011


Examining Veterans' Employment Issues in Northeast Indiana

OPENING STATEMENTS

Chairman Marlin A. Stutzman

   Prepared statement of Chairman Stutzman

Hon. Bruce L. Braley, Ranking Democratic Member
  

    Prepared statement of Congressman Braley


 

WITNESSES

Hon. W. Suzanne Handshoe, Mayor, Kendallville, IN

    Prepared statement of Ms. Handshoe

Mark A. Dobson, President, Warsaw-Kosciusko County Chamber of Commerce, Warsaw, IN

    Prepared statement of Mr. Dobson

Michael S. Landram, President and Chief Executive Officer, Greater Fort Wayne Chamber of Commerce, Fort Wayne, IN

    Prepared statement of Mr. Landram

Gregg Norris, Human Resources Manager, BAE Systems, Electronic Systems Sector, Fort Wayne, IN

    Prepared statement of Mr. Norris

Chris R. Straw, Co-Founder, Team Quality Services, Auburn, IN

    Prepared statement of Mr. Straw

LTC Anthony D. Tabler, USA (Ret.), Senior Business Development Manager, Communications and Force Protection Systems, ITT Electronic Systems, Fort Wayne, IN

    Prepared statement of Colonel Tabler

Mark W. Everson, Commissioner, Indiana Department of Workforce Development, Indianapolis, IN

    Prepared statement of Mr. Everson

Gary Tyler, Indiana State Director, Veterans' Employment and Training Service, U.S. Department of Labor

    Prepared statement of Mr. Tyler

LTC Marcus Thomas, ARNG, Indiana National Guard

    No Prepared statement of Colonel Thomas


EXAMINING VETERANS' EMPLOYMENT ISSUES IN NORTHEAST INDIANA


Wednesday, October 19, 2011

U. S. House of Representatives,

Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity,

Committee on Veterans' Affairs,

Washington, DC.

The subcommittee met, pursuant to notice, at 10:00 a.m., in the Main Branch of the Allen County Public Library, 900 Library Plaza, Fort Wayne, Indiana, Hon. Marlin A. Stutzman [chairman of the subcommittee] presiding.

Members Present:  Representatives Stutzman and Braley.

OPENING STATEMENT OF CHAIRMAN STUTZMAN

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Good morning.  I'd like to welcome you all to the subcommittee hearing, the Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity.  I want to welcome each of you here today.  This is a great crowd.  Thank you for coming out today
for this official meeting of the subcommittee. 

I'm Congressman Marlin Stutzman and to my left is Congressman Bruce Braley, who I'll introduce to you here in a little bit.  I want to say thank you to our panelists and to each and every person who
is here, and especially to our veterans today.  We want to say a special thank you to you for your service to our country. 

Usually, when we hold hearings we are sitting in Washington.  Today I'm delighted to be here in Fort Wayne.  Northeast Indiana is home to 48,000 veterans.  These men and women have served our nation with
honor, and it is my honor to serve their voice in Congress on the House Veterans' Affairs Committee.  Chairing the Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity, I have the opportunity on working on veterans' employment and education issues
alongside the ranking member of this subcommittee, the Honorable Bruce Braley, who represents Iowa's 1st Congressional District.

And we actually just had a hearing in Iowa on Monday and the hospitality in Iowa is just as generous as I hope you'll find here in Indiana.  Earlier this week we hosted that committee, and we heard from
Iowa veterans, and I'm happy to have him here today and I want to welcome him. 

Fort Wayne has a long history beginning with settlements by Native Americans in the area followed by a fort built by General Mad Anthony Wayne in the 1790s.  Since then, Fort Wayne has played an important
role in Indiana's history and is known for our manufacturing, education, insurance, healthcare, logistics, defense, secretary, and agriculture.  Fort Wayne has been named an All‑American City on three occasions, and most
recently in 2009. 

We are here today to hear from Hoosiers about the employment difficulties facing far too many members of the Indiana National Guard, the Reserves, and those returning from active duty in Iraq and
Afghanistan, and other parts of the world.  While the unemployment rate for all Indiana veterans was 6.9 percent, data from the Bureau of Labor statistics show that the 35.6 percent of America's Gulf Era 2 veterans, ages 20 to 24, are
unemployed.  While 8.8 percent of Gulf Era 2 veterans, ages 25 to 54, were unemployed. 

More shocking is anecdotal information that as much as 30 percent of returning members of the guard and reserves do not come home to a job.  Clearly, we need to find ways to reduce all of those
numbers.  The House Committee on Veteran Affairs has taken a first step towards that end last week by passing HR 2433, a bill that would provide up to a year of GI Bill benefits to unemployed veterans between the ages of 35 and 60.  The
bill now goes the Senate.  We hope to get the bill to the president for his signature by Veteran's Day along with several other improvements to veteran's benefits.

I want to take a moment to explain that this particular meeting is a formal hearing.  It is to be inserted into the official congressional record.  Keeping with the standard protocol of official committee
hearings, we will not be taking questions from the audience during the hearing today.  Rather, we'll be taking testimony from our panelists that we have arranged for the hearing today. 

I'm also pleased to announce that afterwards, as many of you know and hopefully are aware of, that we will be having an open house at the conclusion of this meeting outside in the hallway.  And looking forward to hearing from veterans, but that will be after this hearing today. 

At this time I'd like to yield to the gentleman from Iowa, Bruce Braley.  We actually not only work together on this subcommittee, on the Veteran Affairs Committee, but our offices are actually
next to each other on the 7th floor in Longworth, as well. 

Thank you, and welcome, Mr. Braley.

[The statement of Mr. Stutzman appears in the Appendix.]

OPENING STATEMENT OF HON. BRUCE L.
BRALEY

Mr. BRALEY.  Thank you, Mr. Chairman.  It's my pleasure to be here today in Fort Wayne, and it's great to see so many veterans out in the audience because we know these issues impact you, your
friends, and your family.  So we're delighted to have you here.  I've told the chairman on more than one occasion that the thing that binds my home town of Waterloo, Iowa to Fort Wayne is that we were both original franchises in the
National Basketball Association.  And then they stole your franchise and moved it to Detroit.  They stole ours and moved it to St. Louis and then to Atlanta.  So that's the one thing that brings us all together is our unified opposition
to people who come in and take great sports franchises out of places like Fort Wayne.

Most of what I know about veteran's issues I learned from my father.  My father enlisted in the Marine Corps when he was 17.  He was a farm kid in Iowa.  He landed on Iwo Jima the day both of the
flags were raised on Mount Suribachi.  And when we had our hearing in Iowa I read from his discharge form which was a two‑page form that really didn't have much information on it.  It had what his interests were when he went back
home, which was farming. 

It had an interest in exploring education when the GI Bill was brand new.  But other than that, there really wasn't a lot of assistance he received at the Great Lakes Naval Training Center when they
sent him packing and he got on a train and headed back to Iowa. 

The good news is we've come a long way in helping veterans try to transition from a active‑duty deployment, whether they're active or in the Guard and Reserve, into the civilian workforce.  But
we've got a long way to go.  The statistics the Chairman cited are totally unacceptable.  When one out every four returning veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan are out of work, that is a shameful legacy for this country, and
that is the entire purpose of the Economic Opportunity Subcommittee that I'm fortunate to work on with Chairman Stutzman.  And we aren't going to rest, and no American should rest, until every veteran who wants a job has a job. 

We heard very compelling testimony in Iowa on Monday, and I know we're going to hear compelling testimony today.  But the thing that came through loud and clear from many veterans who have served their
country with honor and distinction in harm's way, seen their friends injured and killed, is that it's one thing when you come home to have someone say thank you for your service, but the best way I know of to thank a veteran is hire a
veteran.  And what we want to do is come up with some creative solutions to help employers who are looking for great employees and veterans who are looking for work, bridge that gap so that we can find jobs for veterans who want them,
and we can address the huge problems of unemployed veterans that concern us all. 

So I'm very delighted to be here.  I'm anxious to hear the testimony of our witnesses, and I look forward to talking to you afterwards. 

Thank you. 

[The statement of Mr. Braley appears in the Appendix.

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Thank you.  And I would just say this:  One of the joys that I have working on the Veterans' Affairs Committee, is the bipartisanship that is on the committee.  And you hear a lot
of wrangling out of Washington, but I can tell you that both parties, Republican and Democrat, do see the need.  And one of the things that I've appreciated about the President's Jobs Bill and other leadership in Washington
is that we are now focusing more on hiring veterans as they do come home because this is a great need. 

We heard testimony from a gentleman in Iowa who was a captain in the military, a farm kid, had a family, small family.  If you would see him walk through the door, you would say that young man should be able to find work
fairly easy, and he is having a very difficult time finding work, and we hear stories like that.  And Congressman Braley, the heart that he has and the passion that he has for helping veterans is evident as we have heard testimony
from several folks from his district on the problems that they face, whether it's in housing, whether it's in finding employment. 

And so this is a great opportunity for us, and we're excited that we moved out of Washington and are doing these hearings back in our districts because we not only want to highlight the problem, we also want to find solutions and in connecting people and helping our veterans
because we are going to have a great challenge in front of us as veterans come home from these wars.  As they dwindle down, we want to make sure they come home to opportunities, and so that is what our task is on this committee. 

And so with that, we will start the hearing.  And at this time I want to welcome our first panelists today.  We are joined by Mayor Suzanne Handshoe of Kendallville; and Mr. Mark Dobson of the Warsaw‑Kosciusko
County Chamber Commerce; Mr. Mike Landram of the Greater Fort Wayne Chamber of Commerce; Mr. Gregg Norris of BAE Systems, a company right here in Fort Wayne; Mr. Chris Straw of Team Quality Services, a company from Auburn; and Mr. Tony
Tabler of ITT Systems, another defense contractor here in Fort Wayne that employs folks right here at home. 

Each of you will have five minutes to summarize your testimony, and your full written statements will be made part of the hearing record today.  I want to say thank you to each you for taking time to
come to this.  We believe it's very important, and I believe you do as well.  And we're anxious to work together. 

Our timer is here.  We don't have a clock.  But if you watch the lights, green means we go, yellow means slow it down, and red means stop.  But we do want to hear your testimony, so feel
comfortable.  And I'm sure that not only us, but I'm sure the audience welcomes you, as well. 

Mayor Handshoe is a veteran, and her husband is actually in Guantanamo Bay and is going to be home in time for Christmas.  So we're praying for his safe return.  Start with you for your testimony. 
Thank you for being here.

STATEMENT OF THE HON. SUZANNE HANDSHOE, MAYOR, KENDALLVILLE, IN; MARK DOBSON, PRESIDENT WARSAW‑KOSCIUSKO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, FORT WAYNE, IN; MIKE LANDRAM, PRESIDENT AND CEO, GREATER FORT WAYNE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, FORT
WAYNE, IN; GREGG NORRIS, HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER, BAE SYSTEMS, ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS SECTOR, FORT WAYNE, IN; CHRIS R. STRAW, CO‑FOUNDER, TEAM QUALITY SERVICE, AUBURN, IN; AND LTC ANTHONY D. TABLER, USA (RET.), SENIOR BUSINESS
DEVELOPMENT MANAGER COMMUNICATIONS AND FORCE PROTECTION SYSTEMS, ITT ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS, FORT WAYNE, IN

STATEMENT OF THE HON. SUZANNE HANDSHOE

Ms. HANDSHOE.  Congressman Stutzman, Congressman Braley, and gentlemen, thank you for the opportunity to be here today to discuss the very important issues of veterans.  I would like to share
some of my own experiences, both good and bad, and those of family members.  First, I'm a retired Marine Corps Chief Warrant Officer 4.  When I returned to Kendallville after Desert Storm, the economy was weak and jobs were not easy to
find.  I did find a job as a temporary at Kraft Foods while I worked on my degree. 

During the mid 1990s, while an active Marine Corps reservist and Desert Storm veteran, I applied for a position as a caseworker with the Department of Family and Children.  During the interview
process, I was asked if I had to attend any training that would require me to be absent.  I explained that I would be gone for a minimum of two weeks of training a year and possibly additional longer to attend educational
requirements of my rank.  I was flatly told that it would be unfair for the other members of the staff to pick up the slack when I would be gone for the case loads.  So it just wouldn't be fair to them.  Needless to say, I did not
get the job. 

The Northeast Indiana Special Education Cooperative hired me because I was a Marine.  The executive director was a former Marine and felt that I could handle any of the challenges he threw my
way.  When I was activated in 2003 for Operation Enduring Freedom as a casualty assistance officer for Northeast Indiana and Western Ohio, they held my position and were extremely supportive, not only of me, but of my family. 

As mayor we've had a councilman deployed twice in the past few years to Afghanistan and Iraq.  We supported him in any way that we could during his absence.  We also had a firefighter activated for
duty in Afghanistan and, obviously, his position was held and we welcomed him back to our ranks on his return. 

The City of Kendallville was recently awarded the employer support of the Guard and Reserve, the above and beyond award for the support that we show to our military members, and it was really an honor
for us. 

A great story of patriotism is my brother‑in‑law.  He is employed by Graphic Packaging in Kendallville.  He joined the Army due to the events of September 11th.  He served for five years and did three combat
tours.  When he was honorably discharged, Graphic Packaging not only gave him his job back, but they gave him all five years of seniority while he served. 

I've also learned, since we spoke last evening, that Kraft has also held some positions for people who were called to duty.  One of the positions was a maintenance personnel who was actually a
temporary and Kraft held that as a full‑time position and gave it to him when he returned.

Shouldn't we be recognizing or rewarding companies who follow these actions?  I feel we should. 

Last year my husband, Randy Handshoe, interviewed for a teaching position at a middle school.  The panel looked at his resume and commented that he was in the Navy Reserve.  He answered, that is
correct.  One of the members asked him, does this mean that you could be deployed?  He responded with, yes, every person that wears a uniform has this risk.  The next comment was, well, where would that leave us?  He was not
hired. 

Shouldn't we be feeling good about putting on our resume that we are veterans, instead of feeling that maybe we should hide it so that we could get the job?  Randy did receive orders several months later
and was called to duty December 26th, 2010, and he's still serving as a chief petty officer with the staff judge advocate's office in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.  What is troubling to me is that he will return at Christmas with no job, and he
holds a Bachelor's Degree in education.  I'm certain that I have other constituents that are having trouble finding work, or worse, not being offered work because they're reservists who have had multiple deployments
or the threat exists that they would be called to duty. 

As the war continues, it is no longer fashionable to support military members.  How sad.  Perhaps, some consideration should be given to incentivize companies, through tax credits, who do hire
veterans. 

I thank you, respectfully.

[The statement of Ms. Handshoe appears in the Appendix.]

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Thank you.

Mr. Dobson, you're recognized for five
minutes.

STATEMENT OF MARK A. DOBSON

Mr. DOBSON.  Good morning.  Congressman Stutzman, Congressman Braley, thank you so much for holding this hearing here in Fort Wayne today and for the one in Iowa yesterday.  That
you're holding this hearing in Indiana and Iowa shows how much commitment the Congress sees for the veterans of America, and we greatly appreciate that.  I'm humbled and honored to be here to speak on this very important issue; one that
distresses us all when we hear testimony, such as the mayor's testimony, on the difficulty of re‑employment when you return.  Our country's brightest and our country's best have given of themselves so we may continue to enjoy the
freedoms that we all have.  They've stepped forward and they've heeded the call to duty.  And for that, we are all grateful, so now we're compelled to do all we can to make sure that veterans return to America and take their rightful
place in the private sector.

The dichotomy here is that veterans expect no special treatment.  They do not wish to have opportunity handed to them.  They, more than anybody else in the room, understand what America stands for, and
they will carve a significant path in our society.  So I feel like it's our duty to make sure we break down any barriers that might exist out there so they can transition to the private sector. 

With these thoughts in mind, I contacted 30 businesses in Kosciusko County and the veterans officer at Grace College to understand what are some of the issues.  And it seemed as though the consistent feedback
came to three very significant things at this point.  The first thing they all did was tell me how much they value and prize our military and express their sincere appreciation.  But I knew we had to dig deeper and so we did, and three
themes came out; economic constraints caused by the sagging economy, lack of business engagement with the military, and transitional training for veterans. 

The economic constraints are reflected by the
state of our economy today.  Companies facing the uncertainty out there are
putting off hiring decisions.  They're making hard decisions not to hire
whether it be veterans or those who have not served.  In a climate where
unemployment is over 9 percent, job seekers are seeking greater competition
when they're out there.  And, arguably, the training received in the military
would give you a competitive advantage, but that advantage is diminished when
the pool of job seekers is so great. 

The private sector's engagement with the
military is an additional challenge.  Quite often businesses do not have
knowledge of veteran's issues or the availability of veterans.  They don't know
who the contact points are, and they don't know when a veteran might be back
and available for employment.  When a deployment ends or a veteran retires,
it's sometimes the first that we know of in the private sector. 

And, finally, another consistent comment was
that, while the veteran's training is excellent, the transitional skills
sometimes are challenging.  Quite often assistance is needed with resume
development, interviewing skill, and transitional job training.  Obviously,
some skills in the military are very easily transitionable to the private
sector.  If you've been a pilot, you probably can find private sector work. 

But if the job description in the military,
and pardon the candor or pardon the hilarity, includes blowing up things, it's
really hard for the private sector to understand how can I translate those
skills into my workforce.  So we believe there are some things that can be done
to help and move this issue forward.  The post 9/11 GI Bill is a terrific
program to help transition veterans to the private sector, but we think it
could be more effective if chambers of commerce, economic development agencies,
Work One agencies, and those engaged in the private sector are a part of the
process. 

Today we're not traditionally contacted and
don't often know when vets are training for a new job opportunity.  Yet, we
survey our workforce.  We do job databases, and we are probably the best
resource for characterizing what our community needs in terms of employment. 
If you have high level aeronautical skills, as an example, I can find you a
position in Kosciusko County in the orthopaedic industry because the skills are
quite often very similar. 

The second issue that we think we can do to
help on this is have some advanced communications with entities such as ours. 
If we could begin to notify employers in our community that a deployment is
ending in the near future, we believe we could become a resource for veterans
in hiring.  Perhaps positions can be held for those vets as they come back.  We
realize the challenge that the military doesn't want to exactly say when
they're leaving a deployment or ending a deployment, but the sooner we can get
advanced notice, the more we can be a resource. 

And finally, the U.S. Chamber has launched
the Hiring of Our Heroes program.  It's a hundred chambers and the U.S. Chamber
working specifically on this issue.  We have spoken this morning.  Our chamber
and the Fort Wayne chamber are going to be involved in a Hiring of Our Heroes
event.  That engagement, we think, can be of assistance and can help in this
transition, and we're honored and humbled to be able to be a part of that. 

And I see I've gone over my time.  Thank you
for this opportunity. 

[The statement of Mr. Dobson appears in the Appendix.]

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Thank you. 

Mr. Landram, you're recognized for five
minutes.

STATEMENT OF MICHAEL S. LANDRAM

Mr. LANDRAM.  Well, thank you, Mr.
Chairman and members of the subcommittee.  My name is Mike Landram, President
and CEO of the Greater Fort Wayne Chamber of Commerce.  We're the third largest
chamber in the State of Indiana with over 1700 members.  And those members
collectively do about 18 billion dollars a year in annual revenues and serve
over 750 different industries. 

The Greater Fort Wayne Chamber of Commerce is
very involved in veteran affairs issues.  In addition to having veteran‑owned
businesses as our members, we're heavily engaged in advancing the defense
industry and cluster in Northeast Indiana.  What my testimony will center
around is sharing with you the many initiatives this collective group is doing
currently as solutions and offerings to the topic of today's session.  Like the
rest of the country, we are acutely aware of the employment struggles veterans
are faced with.  We have a unique insight into the issues due to having a large
National Guard base here in Fort Wayne.  We're in regular communications with
the base on the issues facing their guardsmen and are actively pursuing
programs to fight unemployment among veterans.  The Greater Fort Wayne Chamber
of Commerce is a charter member of the Northeast Indiana Defense Industry
Association board, or also known as NIDIA.  NIDIA's membership is composed of
businesses, higher Ed, congressional staffers, all working together toward the
common goal, funding the defense industry and providing regional support and
promotion of the industry and the contributions made to the defense industry in
Fort Wayne and Northeast Indiana. 

Secondly, workforce development is a critical
concern for the defense cluster.  Many of the members of NIDIA have worked
together to define their future staffing needs.  Due to primarily an aging
engineer workforce, engineers in many specialized areas will be retiring. 
Members of NIDIA work very closely in collaborative fashion to communicate
their skill needs with the university partners as a way to ensure future
graduates will meet the industry needs. 

Additionally, many small businesses in
Northeast Indiana started and serve within the supply chain of the defense
industry.  For example, NIDIA conducted a member expo as a way for various
small business members to describe their products and services to the defense
industry.  At monthly meetings presentations are done by businesses to the board
that outline how businesses can work collaboratively with the defense industry
in hiring and employing veterans. 

Lastly, Northeast Industry started the PTAC,
Procurement Technical Assist Center, in 2009.  PTAC serves as an advisor to
businesses to inform them how to qualify themselves to do business with the
government.  In many ways this can be an option and an outlet for veterans
starting their own business. 

In addition to our involvement with NIDIA,
the chamber's assisting the National Guard base with implementing a STARBASE
program in Fort Wayne.  STARBASE is geared towards elementary students,
primarily Fifth Graders, to expose them to STEM subject matter.  These students
are nationally ‑‑ or traditionally at‑risk students.  The
program encourages their learning in areas of academics that are historically
under represented in STEM.  Military volunteers from the National Guard, Navy,
Marine, Air Force Reserve, and Air Force bases across the nation work with
students to set and achieve goals by helping apply these abstract principals in
these disciplines to real‑world situations.  STARBASE is a perfect
example of the investment we can make in young people of our society in hopes
that they'll take the experience and apply it to whatever field they choose to
pursue. 

We know the issue of unemployment among
veterans is an issue that will continue for the unforeseeable future given our
current economic state.  To that end our chamber, along with U.S. Chamber of
Commerce, and, as Mr. Dobson had already alluded to, will be hosting a Hiring
Our Hoosiers event in Fort Wayne.  And we're going to consider even expanding
it to Northeast Indiana sometime in the next year.  The scheduling of this
event has not been set precisely due to the uncertainty of deployment schedule
in our area.  These events will benefit not only veterans but are open to
their spouses, as well. 

The issues veterans face concerning
unemployment are substantial.  As home to the National Guard base, we hear
stories of soldiers being deployed only to return to jobs that have been down‑sized
or eliminated.  At the same time in this double‑dip recession, their
spouses are having trouble maintaining employment.  While these issues are not
unique to veterans, they are exacerbated by the inability to determine their
schedule. 

As part of our commitment to further
advancing the military in Fort Wayne, I sit as the secretary of the newly
formed Fort Wayne Base Community Counsel.  Our purpose, as stated, is to
continue to improve the outstanding relationship between the civilian community
and the military service community centered around Fort Wayne, Indiana and to
promote the general welfare, prosperity, and quality of life between the
military and civilian population.  By being involved in this counsel, our goal
is to partner with businesses and military in order to create a mutually
beneficial partnership. 

To conclude my testimony, we have been very
active at the state level trying to support our state representative, Tom
Dermody's bill to study these effects of the 3 percent pricing preference for
veteran‑owned businesses.  We are continuing to push in that cause.  We
actually got one of our chamber members, Mr. Jerry Hogan, appointed through
Senator David Long's office through the Military Affairs Commission to be able to
explore the matter further.  If the Greater Fort Wayne Chamber of Commerce can
be of any assistance in this important fight, I encourage you to call us. 

Thank you, again, for the opportunity to
testify.

[The statement of Mr. Landram appears in the Appendix.]

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Thank you. 

Mr. Norris, you're recognized for five
minutes. 

STATEMENT OF GREGG NORRIS

Mr. NORRIS.  Chairman Stutzman,
Ranking Member Braley and distinguished members of the subcommittee, as a
representative of an employer of nearly 1,000 employees in Northeast Indiana, I
appreciate the opportunity to discuss with you the experiences we have had
recruiting and employing nearly 100 veterans into our business.  My name is Gregg
Norris, and I am the human resources manager for the BAE Systems facility here
in Fort Wayne.  BAE Systems is a global defense and security company with
approximately 100,000 employees world‑wide.  At our Fort Wayne facility,
we manufacture a variety of both commercial and defense electronics for
avionics applications.  Our workforce is comprised of approximately 650 union
represented hourly production workers with a balance of 300 support personnel. 
Our company, including legacy owners, has been in Fort Wayne since 1985.  We
have been very fortunate to be able to grow the Fort Wayne business, from just
over 700 employees in 2004, to a planned population of nearly 1,000 by the end
of this year.  Veteran hiring has played a significant role in the success of
this effort.  Local hiring efforts that focus on veteran hiring include
participation in the BAE Systems Corporate Warrior Integration Program of which
I have provided additional information in my written testimony.

Local hiring efforts also reach a large
military audience by advertising all of the Fort Wayne openings through
vetjobs.com.  Career Builders talent network is also utilized which reaches 98
percent of transitioning military through their partnerships with the top
military job boards, Department of Veteran Affairs, and the primary social
media source, Facebook. 

BAE Systems participates in a variety of
corporate hiring career fairs across the country, including last year's
participation in Chicago where Fort Wayne employees attended.  When we consider
veterans during our recruiting process, we feel there are many positive skill
sets that these individuals automatically offer to our company.  Two of the
talents that servicemen and women offer immediately, as a result of their
military experience, are teamwork and a sense of self discipline.  It is
critical to our business that we have employees with the necessary skills to
effectively work together.  Like the military, for us to be successful, we must
all work together towards a common goal or mission.  The discipline that is
instilled in soldiers, as part of their military background, is also a strongly
desired employee attribute.  We need people that show up for work, arrive on
time, support our leadership, and have a strong sense of respect for
themselves, their co‑workers, and the company's values.  All
characteristics we typically find in our veterans. 

In terms of the recommendations that I would
offer to the committee based on feedback from our recruiting team, I would
first and foremost encourage continued focus on education and opportunities for
veterans to return to school.  Many of the positions within BAE Systems require
college degrees which can be an obstacle for veterans.

Although the majority of our positions are
hourly associates in Fort Wayne and require only a high school diploma, post‑secondary
educational experiences can still be of great value to a veteran candidate in
differentiating themselves from a very large pool of potential candidates. 

As I considered other recommendations, I
thought it might be beneficial if I spoke with a veteran that we recently
hired.  For purposes of this testimony I will refer to our veteran employee as
Bruce.  Bruce is an 11‑year veteran who served in both Afghanistan and
Iraq.  He served in multiple capacities, including his final duty as lead
security for his executive officer.  Bruce saw extensive combat action while in
theater and was eventually released from duty in 2007 due to severe injuries he
had sustained.  It gave me a profound sense of gratitude and honor to listen to
Bruce describe the sacrifices he had made for our country. 

I asked Bruce how he had heard about our job
openings and why he applied for one of our positions.  He told me that he had
maintained a close relationship with his former executive officer who had
retired from the military and taken a position with BAE Systems in
Fayetteville, Georgia.  Bruce's former executive officer had recommended BAE
Systems as a strong company with good values.  Bruce also recalled several instances
of BAE Systems equipment that he had used while on active duty.  Bruce then did
an Internet search on BAE Systems and found our production associate job posting
online.  He applied, met all the selection criteria and joined our team on
August 29th, this year. 

I then asked Bruce what recommendations he
might have for the subcommittee.  Bruce hesitated for a long moment and said,
tell them I would describe how I felt when I left the service in one word,
helplessness.  Bruce went on to tell me that he vividly recalls receiving his
military paperwork and being told he was free to leave, but he had no idea what
to do next.  He had been provided some resume building assistance, but he had
no idea where or how to start finding a job, let alone a career. 

After listening to Bruce's story I would
respectfully recommend some attention be given to what is provided in the way
of out placement services for our veterans.  Resume building is one small piece
of this process.  There is, however, so much more in the way of career
counseling provided by out placement companies.  These services would provide
immeasurable benefit to our veterans.  BAE Systems uses similar companies to
provide this much needed service for our employees that are impacted by
reductions in force.  The employees that we are no longer able to employ are
very appreciative of this service.  I would expect that our veterans would feel
the same sense of appreciation should they be offered this assistance as they
rejoin civilian life. 

Chairman Stutzman and distinguished members
of the subcommittee, we at BAE Systems are proud to be able to support our
fighting men and women, both in combat, and in the workplace when they return
to life at home.  Thank you so much for the opportunity to speak with you
today.

[The statement of Mr. Norris appears in the Appendix.]

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Thank you. 

Mr. Straw, you're recognized for five
minutes. 

STATEMENT OF CHRIS R. STRAW

Mr. STRAW.  Thank you.  Good morning. 
My name is Chris Straw and I'm a business owner with Team Quality Services
located in Auburn, Indiana.  And I have unique perspective being on this panel
because I am both an employer and I am also a veteran.  And I've been on both
sides of that table when you're trying to be interviewed and when you're
interviewing.  It does, it provides a unique perspective for me, and I see both
sides.  I flew for the Air Force Reserve out of Grissom from 1994 through 2003,
was deployed to Afghanistan after September 11th, started my company in 1997. 
And trying to run a company from halfway across the globe is quite challenging
as you can imagine.  And that actually is what forced me to get out of the
military in 2003.  I had to make a choice of what I was going to do, and I was
fortunate that I had a job to come back to because I knew the boss very well. 
It was me. 

And when I looked at this testimony today, I
tried to break it down into three main areas that I felt were important based
on my point of view.  And one of them is the lack of familiarity with Northeast
Indiana with the military.  There's just not a lot of involvement for regular
folks to interact with the military and get to know how the military works. 
Being in the Air Force Reserve, I got to travel all over the globe and
throughout the United States.  And in my written testimony I made an example of
the State of Texas which has a lot of military bases there.  The cities are
very familiar with the military.  You take San Antonio, countless military
bases in that one city alone.  The chances that somebody there probably knows a
veteran, probably knows somebody that works at a base, or they work at a
company that supports the base.  They understand a little bit better than what
I think Northeast Indiana does of how the military works and what those people
are like. 

And with that, unfortunately, we're faced
with getting an education of the military in Northeast Indiana through
resources such as the news, Hollywood.  And that's where our perspective comes
from which as we know, and I know as a veteran, that's not the truth.  And so
unfortunately there's kind of a clouded view when it comes to perception of
military veterans in Northeast Indiana. 

The second thing I would say is that it has
to do with the skill set, and I refer to Mr. Dobson's testimony where he said
the military does an excellent job of training their people for specific jobs
and a lot of those excellent skill sets of teamwork and things Mr. Norris
touched on do transfer over, but it is a very competitive environment right
now, and there needs to be more than just that. 

Those are great things that the veteran
brings along, but I'm also interviewing people with high unemployment, I'm
getting people for jobs that are maybe an hourly type of a job, and I get people
with Ph.D.'s coming in, and they've been unemployed for nine months, a year,
year and a half.  So it really puts the military member almost at a
disadvantage, especially if they don't have the education to match that. 

And I would say the third thing would be the
interaction with the Guard.  And being a Reserve guy myself, I completely
understand how the Reserve system works, and I understand the commitments that
are caused by that.  However, again, based on the lack of education in
Northeast Indiana and the businesses that are here, they don't. 

And what Ms. Handshoe was talking about where
when people get interviewed, are you a member of the Guard Reserve?  Yes.  You
know, as you're interviewing people, it's sad to say, you're looking for
reasons to eliminate this person because I've got to narrow my field down to
who can take this job.  And that's a ‑‑ I would consider our
company a small business.  And in a small business I don't have thousands of
people in my office.  I have ten.  And so to hire somebody that may or may not
be able to be there, I look at the size of my office and what that means if
somebody, all of a sudden, get a notice that they're deployed.  What does that
mean to me?  Well, that means I have to either replace that or absorb that in
my other colleagues. 

Companies operate as lean as possible right
now especially, and so it's very difficult to absorb it because you've built it
so that you can't absorb it.  And so what do you do?  Do you bring in somebody
to temporarily fill that assignment, hire them on as an employee only to let
them go when the reservist comes back and then I'm faced with unemployment, for
paying the guy that I hired in temporarily. 

So you can see the struggle and the uphill
battle that the veteran faces when he's sitting in the interview.

Unfortunately, you're almost considering
whether I put that on a resume or not, and that's very sad, very sad. 

But I think, like I said, it has to do a lot
with the education of, not only the veterans, but also the people in this
community to embrace and understand what it means to be veteran and what a
veteran can bring to them. 

Thank you.

[The statement of Mr. Straw appears in the Appendix.]

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Thank you. 

Mr. Tabler, you're recognized for five
minutes.

STATEMENT OF LTC ANTHONY D. TABLER

Colonel TABLER.  Congressman Stutzman,
Congressman Braley, I would like to thank you in advance for giving me an
opportunity to share my views on ways to help veterans, the National Guard,
reservists.  My name is Tony Tabler.  I work for ITT Electronic Services.  I
spent 22 years in the army retiring as a lieutenant colonel in 2001.  And since
retiring I've had regular contact with members of the active military and
veterans.  I've spoken to them at their military places of duty, in the
community, and at the Fort Wayne Rescue Mission.  I'm going to share my views
on what I think can be done to help decrease the unemployment rate for
veterans. 

Helping veterans to find employment starts
when they transition from the military units and they return to civilian life. 
When I transitioned from the military at Fort Gordon, Georgia, I received
guidance and coaching at the transition office on how to write a resume and how
to best describe my skills and capabilities in a way that the civilian sector
would understand.  Transitioning for me was easy.  I was a lieutenant colonel
with an advanced degree, many contacts in defense companies.  However, this is
not the case for our younger veterans.  The excitement of leaving the military
quickly fades for some veterans when they arrive at their home town, and try to
figure out what they want to do as civilians. 

I believe it is important for the veteran to
be able to visit, for lack of better words, a civilian in processing center
that provides an opportunity for them to take a job aptitude test to determine
the work that would best be suited for them.  Not sure where this would occur,
but potentially it could be conducted at an existing Veteran Affairs facility. 

During the civilian in processing, the
veteran should be given assistance in further developing their resume that
allows them to match their skills against the job skills needed in the
community.  At the in‑processing facility, they should also be coached on
how to participate in a job interview.  It would also be valuable if, at that
in‑processing facility in the community, they had a listing of military
friendly businesses and job opportunities. 

With regard to military friendly businesses,
I believe that offering some type of tax credit to companies who hire veterans
would encourage them to be military friendly and make it appealing for them to
hire veterans.  Also, as was mentioned before, veterans should be encouraged to
provide higher education.  Many soldiers have little or no family support when
it comes to pursuing higher education even though they have educational
benefits. 

Once in the community, I believe it's also
important to encourage veterans to periodically visit a veteran gathering place
for professional development.  This could potentially take place at a Veteran
Affairs, National Guard facility or places of worship.  But this would be a
great opportunity for caring professionals in the community to periodically
speak with and mentor veterans.  I'm sure that professionals in the community
would be willing to donate their time and offer free seminars that benefit
veterans.  Places of worship should also be encouraged to reach out to the
military and their families.  Opportunities for people arise when they have
personal connections with other people who are interested in their success. 

I would now like to just share a few things
about what ITT is doing to recognize and care for our veterans.  ITT hires
veterans in the course of our normal hiring activities.  We e‑mail job
openings to NAVNET for posting.  We also post to recruitmilitarry.com and
vetjobs.com.  We periodically attend recruit military career fairs and place
advertisements in the Search and Employ quarterly magazine sponsored by Recruit
Military.  The website nd.com scrapes our geospatial systems website daily, and
they post job listings to numerous websites and provide opportunities for
veterans. 

In addition, we post to Monster which has
military.com and Linkedin which is a business related social networking site in
an effort to target veterans.  In Fort Wayne ITT is also a member of the
Northeast Indiana Defense Industry Association which was discussed before.  And
this group also focuses on the employment of veterans and does so by sharing
resumes between the various companies.  Although I have made just a few brief
comments I hope that I've sparked a few ideas that will result in ways to
reduce the unemployment rate of veterans. 

And in summary, veterans need organized help
with writing their resumes, finding jobs in military friendly businesses, and
encouragement to get their college degrees.  They need caring and mentoring
professionals from the community to come alongside them to keep them focused on
professional growth.  Last, but not least, they need caring members of the
community who are looking out for them. 

Thank you for this opportunity to testify.

[The statement of Colonel Tabler appears in the Appendix.]

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Thank you.  At this
time I typically limit members on the committee five minutes, but since it's
just the two of us and we're in charge, we're going to go ahead and extend our
question and answer time, especially due to the size of the panel. 
And politicians typically do need a limit, but we're going to waive that today
because I think there's some important information here. 

But I'd like to start with Mayor Handshoe. 
The Uniformed Services Employment and Re‑employment Rights Act, known as
USERRA, prohibits employers from refusing to hire or rehire someone because of
their military status.  Just like your husband's experience, would you feel
that his rights were violated and was there any consideration of pursuing those
rights under USERRA, which is a difficult position to be in?

Ms. HANDSHOE.  We did talk about
that.  I do feel they were violated because, as I indicated to him, you can't
ask a person their marital status or if they have children.  He felt that would
black mark being in a small community, looking for another teaching position
from other corporations in our community.  And you know how small Kendallville
is, and that's a strong possibility, so that's why we didn't pursue it. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  As you work with
businesses in Kendallville in your community, and I know you as a veteran are a
strong advocate for veterans in employment, do you find employers in
Kendallville and the businesses that you communicate with, are they aware of
the incentives that are currently available for hiring veterans and is there
any emphasis from a lot of the businesses you talk with regarding hiring
veterans.

Ms. HANDSHOE.  I think the larger
corporations do, and I did mention two of them.  And I think that is a culture
within that corporation that does that.  I think it would be helpful if we did
do some sort of, as the other gentlemen spoke of, some sort of a hiring ‑‑
if we could collaborate as a region, not just have Fort Wayne or Kosciusko, but
if we did it as a region to talk about hiring veterans and heroes. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Because that's one of
the things I've found over these discussions.  And me being a small business
owner, before being a Member of Congress, I was
not aware of those incentives available.  It seems that the larger companies do
have a program.  I just visited UPS this morning, and they have a program.  I
visited the GM plant yesterday.  They have a program and, actually, have a
fantastic wall there in the main lobby recognizing their veterans.  But I think
for a lot of the smaller businesses ‑‑ and I know the challenges
they have ‑‑ they're trying to stay above water.  They're trying to
survive in a difficult economy.  That's not something that's at the forefront. 

And I think, maybe, Mr. Landram,
you might have some comments regarding that, as well, and how can we
communicate that better to small business owners because small businesses make
up a large portion of those who are hiring. 

Mr. LANDRAM.  Yes, that's very
correct, Congressman.  I know that 86 percent of our members employ 50 or less
employees.  And I know that Fort Wayne, Northeast Indiana, also mirror that's
same statistic.  So the large companies are going to have in‑house HR
professionals like Mr. Norris next to me that are going to be very well aware
of that.  But the small business owner, you know, is trying to get the doors
open on time every day and is trying to get the product out the door, and has a
lot of balls in the air they're juggling.  So ways to keep disseminating that
and re‑reminding people, whether it's outreach done from the various
military support, you know, and other employment supportive type of services,
you know, mini campaigns, if you will, will be helpful to keep that in front. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Mr. Landram, you
mentioned a bill that State Representative Tom Dermody has filed in the state
legislature.  Could you talk a little bit more about that and how that would
work, more of the details about that. 

Mr. LANDRAM.  Yes, exactly.  Well, in
the last legislative session, House Bill 1183 would have essentially provided a
price preference, you know, for a veteran owned business to be able to
compete.  You know, in Indiana you've got minority and women‑owned
businesses that have a higher price preference, and it does put a veteran‑owned
business, if you will, at a disadvantage.  And I admit having many
conversations.  Mr. Hogan, as an example, explained that he just would opt not
to bid on certain projects because he knew, in the end, you know, that he
wouldn't be considered under that case. 

And he was quite voiceful about that
situation, and we had campaigned in the last session hard to, at least, get the
conversation started.  The conditions weren't fertile to get the bill passed. 
But I think through our efforts and the efforts of others, a study summer
session committee was formed.  And we were able to get Mr. Hogan placed on that
commission to explore that, and we're hopeful that we could get that advanced
in the next legislative session in 2012.

Which again, starting a business, you know,
for a veteran becomes another viable option in as much as gaining good high
quality employment. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  And maybe just to segue
off of that, then I'll come back to Mr. Dobson, Mr. Straw, you are a small
business owner and a tough boss, it sounds like.  Why did you
want to start a small business?  And did any of the other men and women that
you served with in the military talk about starting their own businesses?  It's
difficult because, obviously, right now the economy is not great‑‑ I
talk to a lot of folks that say if I were trying to start a business today, I
wouldn't mess with it.  But, when you have an idea and you have a
dream to do something, you set out to do it, and you set out to accomplish
that.  Can you talk a little bit about that and then also your experiences in
hiring veterans and what you see and hear. 

Mr. STRAW.  Sure.  First of all, as a
small business, start‑up company, you're right, the thing you're focusing
on is making sure the doors stay open, for one.  And when I hear what Mr. Norris
is saying about all the things that they have to hire veterans, I'm envious,
but just don't have the time or the staff to dig that deep into it.  When we
have a position that's open, it's not like we have a big forecast of when it's
going to be open.  It's open until next Tuesday.  Very quickly we need to get
candidates in, get them interviewed and get them hired. 

And I would say as the reason for starting my
business, my goal, since I was probably seven years old, was to fly airplanes,
so that was the ultimate dream, and went to college at Purdue to study that. 
But then you get out of Purdue with all my certificates to fly airplanes, of
course nobody wants to ride on a airplane with a pilot that doesn't have
experience.  That was when I joined the military, was to do that, fly out of
Grissom.  What was unique about that is I'm flying alongside the guys, because
we're a reserve base, these guys fly for United, Delta, everywhere else during
the week.  They come fly at Grissom on the weekends or one night a week.  It
gave me perspective into the airline life before I actually got into it.  And I
realized, as I was also starting a family, that might not be the life for me,
and so then I started looking at other options.  And once again, I have a very specialized
skill that I need to take to market.  You know, luckily it was flying
airplanes, which was great, versus I loaded ordinance or something like that. 
But it's a tough market, tough market.  Born and raised in Indiana, I wanted to
stay here.  Not a lot of airlines based out of Northeast Indiana.  And so I
looked at starting a business.  Did that.  We've been very successful, very
fortunate, very lucky, but it hasn't been easy along the way. 

And when you're faced with I need the right
candidate for the position, I need the right person.  Unfortunately, being a
veteran and a college degree, they're about the same.  I really need somebody
who can do the specific job, don't have a lot of time for training.  We don't
have some elaborate training program, so I need somebody that can come in and
start running right away. 

And like I said, it's sad, but it's like
that.  But as small business person, it's the truth. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  And to follow up on
that, do you know how many veterans do you employ currently?  And when you're
doing interviews, you have the ability to identify with veterans.  And as they
are doing interviews, is there something that you consistently see and say, as
you interview a veteran, this is going ‑‑ if they were doing an
interview ‑‑ since they're doing an interview with me and I am a
veteran, and I understand where they're coming from, if they were doing an
interview with someone who wasn't a veteran, this is going to turn that
particular person off?  Is there something that you see, particularly?

Mr. STRAW.  When I'm interviewing a
veteran, I understand where they're coming from.  I know what is out there.  As
far as how many veterans we have on staff right now, there's six, and that's
current.  In previous years we had a gentleman that was National Guard flew
helicopters in Michigan at a guard unit out there and that was right around
September 11th, and so the whole world changed as we know.

And we had to deal with that.  You can't just
give up as a small business.  This is my income, so we had to find ways to work
with him and work around it. 

And I'm trying to remember your last
question, I'm sorry. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  As far as,
Mr. Norris mentioned resume building and we heard that out in Iowa as well.  Do
you see things that come in on resumes that you would say, you know what, if I
were filling out your resume, I would give you this sort of advice?  Do you see
that typically on resumes, as a hiring employer, because, as they put their
resumes together, is there something that we can do in that transition to help
them put resumes together better.

Mr. STRAW.  Yes.  I think Colonel
Tabler elaborated on that a little bit, when you right write a resume don't
just say, I was part of this unit.  That doesn't mean anything to most people,
tell the skills that you learned, which might be the technical skill, but also
elaborate on the teamwork and things that you do within your unit.  Show me
those transferable skills because that's the first thing that comes to my
mind.  Great that you're in this unit or did this.  What's it going to do for
me.

I hate to sound me centered but, when you're
hiring somebody, that's what you're doing, you're trying to fill a position.  I
need a candidate that best matches that position, so having somebody help a
veteran write a resume.  And nowadays you can't just have a generic resume. 
They've got to be very tailored for what job you're looking for.

Generic resume, for a small business guy,
isn't going to do it. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Mr. Dobson, you had mentioned
that 30 companies responded to your survey, and you mentioned that one of the
major challenges is that businesses do not know where to find available
veterans in your testimony.  Your 9 members, are they aware of DVOPS, which is
Disabled Veteran Outreach Program Specialist, and LVERS, Local Veteran
Employment Representatives?  Members of your chamber, are they aware of
them, and do they have any interaction with those particular entities?

Mr. DOBSON.  Great question.  Thank
you.  The larger companies, Fortune 500's, such as Biomet, Zimmer, or DePuy,
yes, they would know that.  They have the HR staff, professional staff.  The
disconnect kind of follows along Mr. Landram's testimony; that is, about the
same number, about 83 percent of our members employ 50 or less.  They don't
have a specialized HR department.  They aren't aware of that.  That's where I
believe, and thank you for asking the question, because that's where I believe
a chamber of commerce can become a resource.  If we can connect with those same
folks, we can get that word out to our members.  We serve our members by
providing information to them, one of the things we do, by providing
information.  And if we could do that, I think we can strengthen or we can help
in the process.  There'll still be some challenges in communication, but we
hope we can bridge that gap.  I know all of us would want to be able to do
that. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Do you have any
suggestions or ideas how the state employment services could
communicate better through DVOPS, through LVERS, through their tools that they
have, whether it's to chambers or to small businesses.

Mr. DOBSON.  You know, small
businesses are challenged.  Mr. Straw has spoken to it well.  I used to run one
of those myself.  Trying to keep the door open, trying to stay on top of
things, and you use your trade association or your local chamber as your
reference source.  There are great trade associations throughout the State of
Indiana that can help bridge that gap.  Local chambers, the state chamber can
help bridge the gap.  I would, you know, suggest those folks be in contact with
the various trade associations and various chambers and educate us on what they
do and how we can help, and then let us start to communicate to our members
because our members will respond to that type of information.  They'll be very
excited to get it. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Colonel Tabler, you
mentioned several things that made your transition from the military easy.  Any
suggestions on the transition assistance program, to improve it. 

Colonel TABLER.  The transition
assistance program actually they have with the military, I think it's on track,
but, unfortunately, it's rushed.  It's quick, and you'll just get kind of like
an opportunity to work a resume at one time, but you really haven't thought
through what you really want to do when you get out of the military.  I think
in the military transition itself, I think it was fine. 

I think the issue was when you get to the
community.  You just don't know what to do at that point.  You know, soldiers
are accustomed to showing up in formation, spending time with their non‑commissioned
officers, giving guidance, giving direction, somebody right there with them to
mentor them.  So I think it's when they get to their community, that's when
they're just really lost.  I know when I got to Fort Wayne I was fortunate
because I went to work with ITT.  I already knew a lot of those guys there
because we had worked together on active duty. 

But the problem is when they show up at their
home towns, they just don't know where to turn.  They just don't know what to
do.  They don't know how to tailor those resumes to make sure that they're
talking about the skills that are transferable into the civilian sector.  I
know, when I got to Fort Wayne, I really wasn't pointed to any type of
veteran's office, per se.  It was just the other veterans that I worked around
that came alongside me. 

So I think in the military, it's fine, but
that just gets you started.  Once you hit the civilian community, you still
need some type of mentoring and help. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Thank you. 

Mr. Braley, I yield to you for questions. 

Mr. BRALEY.  Let's follow up on that,
Lieutenant Colonel Tabler, because after 9/11 one of the biggest problems that
was identified was this problem of interoperability, the inability of various
response agencies to communicate with each other. 

Colonel TABLER.  Right. 

Mr. BRALEY.  On our subcommittee we
hear over and over and over again one of the biggest obstacles for veterans transitioning
to the civilian workforce is that they come out of a world of acronyms, which can be
a huge asset to you if you're looking for work in the defense industry, which
lives and dies with those acronyms. 

Colonel TABLER.  Right. 

Mr. BRALEY.  But if you're working for
an employer who doesn't have that same culture, it can actually be an obstacle
to you in getting employment.  And I mentioned in Waterloo, what we need is a
Rosetta Stone program for transitioning veterans to understand how to use those
same job skills and language in a much different workplace, and I don't see
that coming anytime soon. 

But you made a comment about how job aptitude
coming out of the military is rarely assessed the same way it is going in. 
When I was in high school a hundred years ago, we took the armed services
vocational aptitude battery test.  It was mandatory for every high school boy. 
And it was designed to assess your aptitude for military occupations.

But it seems to me we don't do anything. 
When you're coming off of active duty or returning from your guard and reserve
unit, we don't do anything to assess what your aptitudes are for civilian
employment.  And it seems to me that may be an area where we can start to focus
on helping veterans understand more.  Many times
they may have been deployed for extended periods, they've been working in the
military for a long time and, all of a sudden, their career goals have changed
dramatically from when they went in. 

So what's your suggestions on how we deal
with that?

Colonel TABLER.  Well, what would I
say is, first of all, there has to be a way of some office, some organization
translating those military skills that they have and the language that the
civilian sector understands.  And I don't know, maybe it's one of the veteran's
offices in the Fort Wayne community.  But just somebody has to sit down and I
guess really do that work to say, okay, you've got leadership skills.  You've
got certain technical skills.

You've got skills that are great for training
other individuals.  You've got logistic skills.  There's just a whole myriad of
things that those soldiers do in the course of their everyday activities.  It
could be as simple as coming up with a matrix and then, as they see certain
jobs that are open, you know, helping them to write resumes that are tailored
to those jobs.  But there's going to have to be somebody who comes alongside
those soldiers when they get back to the community.  That's probably one of the
veterans affairs offices that should be their first stop, that hands them maybe
a little cheater booklet or something that just really coaches and mentors
them.  Somebody's got to be there in the community, and they have to know that
that individual is there, so they can go looking for them.  I didn't know of
anyone, per se.  Now, if I would have Googled the Internet, I would found folks
in the Fort Wayne area who could have potentially helped me.  But like I said,
for myself it was those vets that I worked with on active duty that I went to work
with at ITT, so it made it real easy for me.  Younger vets don't have any of
those types of things available to them. 

So there has to be identified a location in
cities or towns that those vets know, hey, when you get to such and such a
town, go see this person, and then that person needs to be equipped with some
materials, some ideas to just help and coach and mentor that young man or
woman. 

Mr. BRALEY.  Thank you.  Mayor
Handshoe, Semper Fi.  One of the things that you testified about went directly
back to what Mr. Straw said.  Because I think a lot of us were shocked by the
comment that your husband heard during that interview.  Yet, that is the reality of small business owners in terms of how they're
thinking about filling any job position.  And it strikes me, we have an enormous
educational challenge ahead of us because, as someone whose wife teaches, my
mother's 82 years old, she's still substitute teaching in my home town, I have
tremendous respect for the role that teachers play in educating the next
generation of Americans. 

And education isn't just something that
happens in a classroom.  And if your husband had gotten that job and been
deployed, the students he was teaching would have had an enormous opportunity
to learn about sacrifice and thinking of someone other than yourself when
you're called to a duty.  So I feel badly that we missed that opportunity by
him failing to get that job. 

Ms. HANDSHOE.  Ironically, the high
school had him speak for Veterans Day before he left, and all of the students
that attended that have hit him on Facebook communicated with him since he's
deployed on Facebook and how much they miss him, thank him for his speech so it's
kind of ironic. 

Mr. BRALEY.  And one of the other
things you identified was economic incentives to employers to give them that
extra incentive to hire veterans.  One of the things that I've done is
introduced a bill called Combat Veterans Back to Work Act which is modeled on
an existing incentive that was in place in 2010 that gave employers across the
country incentive to hire unemployed workers, generally.  By giving them a
break on the employer's share of FICA, for hiring an unemployed veteran, and
then giving them an additional tax incentive if they keep them on the payroll
for a year, is that the type of program that you think might be beneficial to
hire more unemployed veterans?

Ms. HANDSHOE.  I do.  Because
communities have a toolbox of incentives that they give to a new business
starting, tax abatements, whatnot.  But to be able to further that with
employees, either be it through the state or federal government, would just be
a plus. 

Mr. BRALEY.  Right.  Mr. Norris, at
our hearing in Waterloo, we had three of Iowa's largest employers.  One of whom
I'm sure you've heard of, Rockwell Collins, which is in the same avionics
industry as BAE.  And we had John Deere and Principal Financial Group.  And one
of the things we know is that employers in the defense industry, like your
company, have a level of sophistication about hiring veterans that some other
businesses, particularly small businesses, don't.  So what lessons can you
share with us, based on BAE's experience, that could be helpful in mentoring
other businesses who lack that sophistication.

Mr. NORRIS.  It's a great question.  I
don't have a lot of visibility into some of the corporate activities that go on
in some of the areas you're talking about, but certainly, I am a beneficiary of
some of the things like the Wounded Warrior Integration Program I talked
about.  I think we clearly recognize what these men and women bring to our
business and I think it's ‑‑ I can appreciate what Mr. Straw has
said, the difficulty with the small business because with a thousand employees
it's little bit easier for us to cover when someone's not there.  I do
appreciate that. 

But I think that it's very important.  I want
to kind of walk back to one thing I mentioned in my presentation about the out
placement service.  We talked about resume building.  That's one very small
piece.  I've probably personally done about 500 interviews in the last five
years of people coming in.  It's really more about the experiences and the
interviews.  Yes, the resume's important to get your name out there, but it's
really more important, I think, with some of the out placement services, in
terms of coaching for interviewing, helping people realize what they bring when
they sit down in an interview, and helping them to express that to a team or
the person they are talking to across the table. 

So I think that's one of the things that we
have an advantage, that we can go to out placement companies to help with our own
employees when we have to go through reductions in force.  But I certainly see
that as a possibility for veterans, as well, to have a service that's more
around counseling, not just around resume building. 

The other thing I thought was interesting, when
I talked to Bruce, the individual veteran that I just mentioned that we just
hired.  He networked through his executive officer.  He found out about us
through that executive officer.  So, perhaps, there's more that we can do in
terms of networking with current vets that are out there in the workplace.  You
know, having them work with those individuals coming in.  I think Lieutenant
Colonel Tabler had mentioned this.  I think that's a great way to look at how
can we do better with the network of current veterans that are in our
businesses today, have them act as mentors and helpers and focusing these
people in the right direction so they can get these great jobs.  So we would
certainly, as a business, love to see some help in that regard, as well, just connect
those people with us. 

Mr. BRALEY.  Let me transition that
comment to you, Mr. Straw, because I used to be Chair of the Small Business
Contracting and Technology Subcommittee and we worked a lot to try to expand
awareness of contracting opportunities with the federal government because 90
percent of those contracts are issued to firms inside the beltway around
Washington, D.C., and 90 percent of them go to larger companies.  And one of
our biggest challenges is to try to help small businesses be more competitive
through that process.  A lot of assistance comes through groups like SCORE,
Service Corps of Retired Executives. 

What I'm hearing here is we almost need a
service corps of retired veterans who can help mentor other people, business
owners, people wanting to start a small business, and share experiences of
making this transition and doing it successfully. 

Mr. STRAW.  I agree.  And I was also
thinking, when Mr. Dobson was talking, how do you reach out to businesses, how
do you educate them?  Some of the benefits you mentioned I've never even heard
of.  So how do you do that?  Do you go door to door?  I think he's right, you
go through the local chamber.  Small businesses are typically active in their
local chamber because they see it as a marketing tool.

They're eager to get anything they can get
from them.  And if it's something like that that can help give me a competitive
advantage of some kind, I'm all for it. 

Mr. BRALEY.  Well, and I'm glad you
mentioned that because there's so many small businesses that fail because of
lack of understanding of the world that they're entering.  And when you have
tremendous resources like we have available online through all of these
agencies and programs, to help you learn how to do a good business plan, how to
do a financial plan, how to go find mentors who can look over your shoulder. 
It seems to me we need to do a better job of helping business owners identify
resources to help them fulfill the mission that brings us all here today. 

Mr. STRAW.  Absolutely, absolutely. 
That's the key, getting the business owners, the people doing the hiring,
educated about what things they can have at their disposal to make that process
easier.  And if it involves helping a veteran getting a job, I think everybody would
agree that would be a winner on both sides. 

Mr. BRALEY.  I want to direct this
last question to you, Mr. Dobson, and to you, Mr. Landram, because you have
similar experiences.  We've talked about how most veterans, when they are
separating, have these strengths going for them; they're highly motivated, they
have critical thinking skills, they have experience with creative problem
solving, and they have a strong work ethic, and they have experience in
teamwork.  Now, to most employers those sound like incredibly valuable assets. 

Why is it, in your opinions, that we have
such a problem making this transition, with great potential employees, to
veterans in the workplace. 

Mr. DOBSON.  That might be a loaded
question.  Do you want to jump on board.

Mr. LANDRAM.  I'll jump on that one
first.  Well, I think the Lieutenant Colonel here intimated to it earlier.  I
mean, the business as a workplace is changing very rapidly as we all know. 
And, you know, if you just take a look at what does a career really consist of
and provide for an individual, if you just take $40,000 a year, and you're
going to work 30 years, and do the math, you know, you're putting a nose bed on
yourself of $1.2 million, is what that means.  And it goes back to the career
preparation.  You know, what you mentioned earlier, Congressman, those are all
great skill sets.  You know, people in general, you know, veterans included,
have difficulty translating that to an employer, you know.  And people need to
be prepped and given those, quote, how‑tos.  How do I articulate that to
an employer; how do I take these credentials on my resume, these experiences
and translate them into a skill conversation that says here's where I am the
value added?  I mean, no one will argue what military does for self‑discipline,
initiative, teamwork, leadership, work ethic, integrity, honesty.  Nobody will
argue that with somebody who has served our country.  The point is those are
all high corporate values, business values.  People just simply need help when
they are re‑entering the workforce in being able to do that, not just on
their resume, but how do they do that face‑to‑face with an
employer?  And I would advocate and support what you're on to.  I think that's
very good. 

Mr. DOBSON.  Thank you, Mike.  Great comments,
and I agree entirely with what he said.  That's why I think I testified ‑‑
or I know I testified that I think, arguably, a former military has a better
base for work.  These are all desirable qualities, so I think the disconnect
then becomes matching the skills to the industries in the community.  And the
Work One office shared that one of the challenges is quite often, and
rightfully so, a veteran wants to return to the home town community and,
perhaps, the home town community job market does not match those skill sets. 
And so we need to counsel to help, perhaps, with some additional training to
leverage those skills. 

If you were to return to Kosciusko County,
Mr. Straw's experience in aviation would be similar to ours.  We're not the
aeronautical capital of the world, but we can certainly use some advanced
machinists.  There's a critical need for that in Kosciusko County.  There's a
critical need for advantaged agricultural folks.  And if these folks who are
counseling, as the Lieutenant Colonel talked about, these veteran affairs
offices were engaging with folks that have this industry knowledge, we might be
able to guide them a little bit better and help them use either the GI Bill
that they opt to use once they're done or help them connect with a local Ivy
Tech, so they can take those high quality skills learned in the military and
convert them and use them in the industry. 

It wouldn't make a lot of sense to come back
to Kosciusko County and think, I'm going to be become a pilot and I'm going to
be able to fly for a major airline.  But transportation and logistics are
important to us, and there's probably some way that we can turn those skills
around and use them in our community.  And we want to be that source.  We want
to be able to help.  So thank you for a very good question. 

Mr. BRALEY.  I yield back, Mr.
Chairman. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Thank you.  That
concludes this panel.  I think one thing I think we can recognize is that all
of these witnesses have shown the importance of education and information to
the veterans and also the importance of using the GI Bill's education and
training benefits, and specifically there is some counseling offered in Chapter
36 of that. 

And, Mr. Norris, I appreciate your
testimony.  You touched on some great points and gave some ideas on
communicating those needs that we have. 

So I want to say thank you to each and every
one of you.  At this time you're excused, and we will call up the second
panel. 

Okay.  The second panel is going to consist
of Mr. Mark Everson of the Indiana Department of Workforce Development, Mr.
Gary Tyler of the Veterans Employment and Training Service, and Lieutenant
Colonel Marcus Thomas of the Indiana National Guard.  Thank you to each of you
gentlemen for being here today, and we will look forward to each of your
testimony.  And I believe we'll start with Mr. Everson.  You'll all be
recognized for 5 minutes. 

Mr. Everson, you're recognized for 5
minutes. 

STATEMENTS OF MARK W. EVERSON, COMMISSIONER, INDIANA DEPARTMENT OF WORKFORCE
DEVELOPMENT, INDIANAPOLIS, IN; GARY TYLER, INDIANA STATE DIRECTOR, VETERANS'
EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING SERVICE, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR; AND LTC MARCUS
THOMAS, INDIANA NATIONAL GUARD

STATEMENT OF MARK W. EVERSON

Mr. EVERSON.  Mr. Chairman, ranking member
Braley, thank you for the opportunity to testify.  The Department of Workforce
Development manages all state unemployment insurance programs, as well as
federal workforce training programs in Indiana.  As such we operate 90 one-stops,
as they're commonly called, or here in Indiana Work One centers across the
state.  Service to veterans is an employment element of both these programs. 
Indiana's labor force is approximately 3.1 million, down from just over 3.2
million in the summer of 2007.  The state's unemployment rate peaked in June
2009 at 10.9 percent.  Since that time the unemployment rate has fallen to just
below 9 percent. 

In January 2010 over 271,000 Hoosiers
collected unemployment insurance benefits from either the state or the federal
government.  Since that date, the number of Hoosiers collecting benefits has
declined to approximately 115,000 at present.  So things are better, but there
is still a high level of unemployment which is, of course, a concern to us
all. 

The 2010 American Communities Survey, or the
ACS, conducted by the Census Bureau, estimates that Indiana is home to
approximately 469,600 veterans or nearly 10 percent of the adult population. 
However, almost 200,000 Indiana veterans are over 65, and generally not in the
workforce.

Veterans age 18 to 65 total approximately
276,000.  According to the ACS the 2010 unemployment rate among Indiana's
veterans was 12.4 percent, compared with the total state unemployment rate of
10.7 percent during the same period.  Additionally, ACS indicates the education
level of Indiana's veterans tends to be higher than that of civilians with the
exception of those that have obtained a Bachelor's Degree or higher. 

Indiana is committed to providing quality
employment services to veterans at its Work One centers.  Veterans receive
priority service, and most of the centers have an on‑site veteran
specialist to assist with the employment needs.  DWD currently receives funding
to employ 62 veteran employment and training staff throughout Indiana.  34 of
these positions are the LVERS, mentioned by the chairman already, and 28 of
these are the DVOPS.  All of the LVERS are required to be veterans.  And the
DVOPS must be veterans with a service‑connected disability. 

For all training programs overseen and managed
by DWD, eligible veterans are provided with priority service.

Additionally, DWD ensures that veterans are
provided with priority service in the job‑matching program, meaning in
our online web tool, veterans see the postings 24 hours before anybody else
gets to see them. 

DWD believes that there are four primary
challenges veterans encounter regarding employment opportunities.  First,
veterans have oftentimes been employed in industries among the hardest hit by
the economic recession.  According to a report issued by the U.S. Congress
Joint Economic Committee in May of 2011, post 9/11 veterans are more likely
than non‑veterans to have been employed in manufacturing, construction,
transportation, and other industries that experienced significant job losses
during 2008 and 2009. 

We agree with this finding.  Veterans
continue to struggle with securing gainful employment, especially in the
manufacturing sector, which in Indiana is down 18 percent from its peak
employment in 2007.  While veterans from the Guard or Reserve receive statutory
protection to retain pre‑deployment position on upon completion of their
deployment, as has already been mentioned, if an employer's workforce has been
downsized due to layoffs, the returning veteran may not always find a job
opening upon return. 

The second challenge deals with the skills
veterans developed while serving in the military and their ability to translate
those skills into private sector employment.  We have found that some of the
skills veterans develop do not always directly correlate to certifications and
credentials often required for private employment.  For example, a veteran may
have operated heavy equipment and vehicles during his or her service, but does
not hold a commercial driver's license that is often a requirement for
operating heavy transportation vehicles in private‑sector employment.

Additionally, DWD has found that many
veterans experience difficulty expressing what specific skills they acquired
throughout their service and how these skills transfer to the requirements of
private sector job openings.  Many veterans are modest about their service and
particularly the skills and aptitudes they developed while serving.  Although a
veteran may have developed and utilized essential job skills, his or her
inability to relate those skills to the requirements of a job opening, can lead
a hiring manager to not fully appreciate the skills the veteran has to offer. 

Third while a veteran is deployed overseas, a
number of facets in his or her home life may have changed.  Some of these
changes can include the birth of a child, the loss of a family member, or even
the dissolution of a marriage.  In addition, returning veterans may need to
locate a place to live, establish bank accounts, locate transportation, and
complete many other daily activities for which they may not have been
responsible during their period of service.  These factors often complicate the
job search process which may be given less initial priority by the returning
veteran. 

Finally, there are an increasing number of
veterans returning home with some form of physical or mental disability.  With
advances in medical care, as you well know, fatalities have declined, but an
increasing percentage of veterans return home with a physical disability
potentially limiting future employment opportunities. 

In addition, there are incidences of mental
health issues, including post‑traumatic stress disorder among the veteran
population returning from abroad.  In our experience Indiana employers have
displayed a great willingness to provide employment opportunities to veterans
who have served the United States.  However, some employers may be somewhat
cautious in hiring veterans due to concerns about how PTSD or other mental
health issues may affect performance in the workplace.  Thank you.

[The statement of Mr. Everson appears in the Appendix.]

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Thank you. 

Mr. Tyler, you're recognized for five
minutes.

STATEMENT OF GARY TYLER

Mr. TYLER.  Good morning, Mr.
Chairman, ranking member Braley.  Thank you very much for this opportunity to
testify before the committee about the work we are doing at the Department of
Labor to address the important issue of decreasing unemployment for veterans,
National Guard, and reservists.  We also appreciate the opportunity to discuss
the work we are doing in Indiana.  With nearly 500,000 veterans in the state it
is critical that we provide them with services and support they need to find
and obtain good jobs. 

Again, my name is a Gary Tyler.  I'm the
State Director for the U.S. Department of Labor Veterans' Employment and
Training Service in Indianapolis.  I am dedicated to helping our veterans and
returning service members achieve the goal.  I am accompanied today in the audience
by Heather Higgins, my regional administrator from the ten‑state Chicago
regional office.  I would like to let you know that I am a Vietnam veteran
having served with the famous fighting 4th Infantry Division of the United
States Army. 

The 2010 unemployment rate among Indiana
veterans in our data was 9.0 percent compared to the total state unemployment
rate of 10.2 percent for the same time period.  That differs a little bit from
what the commissioner just stated.  It depends, frankly, on the cohorts used in
measuring at that point in time.  I think the bottom line is that the
unemployment rate of veterans is higher than the general population.  And the
unemployment rate of veterans between the ages of 18 to 24 is particularly
high. 

VETS proudly serves veterans and
transitioning service members by providing resources and expertise to assist
and prepare them for obtaining meaningful careers, maximize their employment
opportunities, and protect their employment rights.  We do this through a
variety of nationwide programs that are an integral part of Secretary Solis's
vision of good jobs for everyone. 

I would like to begin by briefly discussing
some of the programs, along with other initiatives that assist America's
veterans in getting to or back to work and then focus specifically on
information that you requested in your invitation. 

Our principal program is the Jobs for
Veterans State Grant Program.  The Jobs for Veterans State Grant Program is the
principal program that funds the DVOPS and LVERS that have been referenced
today already.  Last year the Jobs for Veterans Program provided services to
nearly 589,000 veterans, and 201 veterans found jobs.  The program in our state
is operated by the Indiana Department of Workforce Development. 

We also have in our department, Homeless
Veterans Reintegration Program.  Not every state has a Homeless Veterans
Reintegration Program, but we do have one in Indiana, operated mainly in the
Indianapolis, Marion County area to meet the needs of these homeless veterans
and help integrate them into the workforce.  VETS administers this program.  In
the program year 2009 over 14,000 homeless veterans participated in the program
through 96 grants, and 8,470 were placed into employment.  Data for program
year 2010 is not yet available as figures for the fourth quarter are still
being verified. 

Another program that we have is the Veteran
Workforce Investment Program which is not operated in each state, but we do
have one in the State of Indiana and operated through the Indiana Department of
Workforce Development and provides veteran's services throughout the State of
Indiana under this program.  In fiscal year 2009 the Veterans Workforce
Investment Program was focused to provide training and employment services in
green energy occupations as envisioned in the Green Jobs Act of 2007. 
Nationwide there are currently 22 grants serving over 4,000 veterans in fiscal
year 2011.  In Indiana training and placement services have been provided to
approximately 3,000 veterans statewide through the program since 2002. 

We also participate in transition assistant
programs with active military bases, as well as with the guard and reserve
members to the extent that we can at Camp Attebury in Southern Indiana.  Our
primary program for assisting individuals with their transitions from military
to civilian workforce is the transition assistance program.  VETS provides an
employment workshop that is a comprehensive, two‑and‑a‑half‑day
program during which participants are provided relevant skills and information
such as job search techniques, career decision making processes, and current
labor market conditions. 

As you know, VETS is currently in the process
of redesigning and transforming the transition assistance program and
employment workshop.  We are creating experiential, effective, and enduring
solutions for successful transition from military to civilian life and
employment.  A new TAP will be based on established best practices and career
transition.  Last year nearly 130,000 transitioning service members and spouses
attended the TAP employment workshop given at one of 270 locations world‑wide. 

Another endeavor that we've participated in
and we're proud of is our connection with the employer community, employer
partnerships.  VETS is also implementing a new approach to employer outreach
which involves pilot programs in partnerships with the private sector
including, as mentioned earlier, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the Society
for Human Resource Management.  We do that here in Indiana through the state
SHRM, Northeast SHRM, and through various chambers throughout the state.  The
U.S. Chamber is also scheduled to partner with us with the veterans workshop
that we have with Operation Hire A Hoosier Vet Career Fair, our 6th annual career fair that's going
to take place next April in Stout Field, Indiana. 

Recognizing that we have the red light on at
this point, you have our written testimony and the data, and I appreciate this
opportunity. 

Thank you, gentlemen.

[The statement of Mr. Tyler appears in the Appendix.]

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Thank you. 

Lieutenant Colonel Thomas, thank you for
being here.

You're recognized for five minutes.

STATEMENT OF LTC MARCUS THOMAS

Colonel THOMAS.  Good morning,
Congressman Stutzman, ranking member of the panel, also veterans who are here
in the audience, as well.  I'm Lieutenant Colonel Marcus Thomas, the State
Family Programs Director for the Indiana National Guard. 

I also have here with me the
employment support for the Guard Reserve, Mr. Doug Gibbons.

Well, in reference to the current economic
conditions within the State of Indiana, several Indiana National Guard service
soldiers and airmen have been impacted by higher under employment and
unemployment.  The Indiana National Guard partners with many organizations who
stand ready to assist our service members in finding and maintaining quality
jobs in today's job market. 

Couple facts I'm going to share,
according to a recent report from the Civilian Employment Index used by the
National Guard Bureau, over 20 percent of our Army National Guard is unemployed
across all states and territories.

Indiana Civilian Employment Index shows 12.6
percent; however, we are 61 percent completed on the index with another 39
percent of soldiers yet to be loaded.  The Indiana National Guard Employment
Coordination Program, of which we've stood up out of Hyde, conducts multiple
face‑to‑face assessments with guard units, soldiers and commanders around the
entire state and tracks the unemployment percentage to be closer to 20 percent. 
Of note, this also includes the recent addition to our high school graduates who
are also entering the job market for the very first time this year.  We see
some of the highest unemployment rates in areas that are hit hardest economically across the state.  Places like Elkhart, South
Bend, Gary and those kind of areas.  The 219th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade,
which is currently deployed to Iraq, have at least 25 percent of their force
projected to return to an unemployment situation.  That's about 425 soldiers
deployed.  About 105 of those have been projected to come back to an
unemployment situation. 

Four of the five largest Army National Guard
states have the highest military unemployment rates or percentages in the
nation those states include Texas, California, Pennsylvania, Indiana, and North
Carolina.  The Indiana National Guard ranks third overall, and we're the fourth
largest guard state with over 14,000 soldiers and airmen in our state.  We
stood up this employment coordination program and since for the past
two and a half years, we have successfully placed over a thousand service
members and spouses in jobs across the state.  This includes all branches of
the military, not just the Army National Guard and the Air National Guard, all
service members within Indiana.  We actively leverage the combination of
education and part‑time job employment.  We, actually, also leveraged the
power of encouraging service members and their families, spouses to maximize
the use of the post 9/11 GI Bill, provide ongoing employment counseling and
financial counseling, as well.  We have 112 employer partners with almost 400
active jobs available that we're constantly pushing through our social media
outlets and our web portals to get service members and families access and make
themselves available to apply for those positions.  We have actually assisted in over
2,100 resume writing counseling sessions with our service members across the
entire state, matching those specific unique skills that were talked about in
previous testimonies with the jobs that are actually out there with our
partners.  And we provide constant follow up with our community partners and
employer partners to make sure those jobs that have been availed to our
veterans are working out, to make sure that it's a best fit for both our
service members and the employers.  We coordinate across the state with various
types of community programs.  The employer support of the guard reserve is a
strong partner of ours, as well.  Several vocational and vet centers across the
state, various types of apprenticeship programs are partners as well. 
The Indiana Workforce Development office, we work very closely with, as well. 
We conducted this last year over 20 job fairs specifically for our military and
their families, military expos.  The annual operation of Hire a Hoosier Veteran
with over a hundred employees that show up every year, 25 universities and
various veteran service organizations come and support
servicemen and their spouses and families who are interested in
finding a job. 

And then finally, my boss, the Adjutant General
R. Martin Umbarger, Adjutant General of the State of Indiana, has taken all
these assets to establish this the Employment Coordination Program out of
Hyde.  There is no additional dollars received from the National Guard Bureau
or other federal funds to set up a program to directly work with each
individual service member and their family with helping them to find a job.  He
consistently encourages all employers to consider a veteran for any open
position especially the young men and woman who are returning from deployment
overseas.  And in a recent comment, business leaders across the state of Indiana
know and praise the value of employees with military experience.  These
community leaders want to make sure
that our men and women who serve this great state and nation are cared for by
partnering up with the community to ensure that jobs are available for those to
apply.

Thank you very much.

[The statement of Colonel Thomas appears in the Appendix.]

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Thank you very much to
all of you for your testimony.  I'll begin with a couple of questions. 

Mr. Everson, given the high level benefits
that the current GI Bill has, why do we see many of the younger veterans coming
back, needing employment assistance instead of attending school?  The benefits
that the GI Bill offers are, I believe, very good.  Where is the disconnect
there?  Why do we not see more utilizing it and to their full extent, as well?

Mr. EVERSON.  I've not thought about
that specific question, but I would try and back up to the whole population. 
And I wouldn't think it would be that different for veterans.  Frankly, when
people come into our offices, and obviously the veterans are an important but a
small portion of those people, they are extremely interested in a job and a job
now.  Training and education by definition is it's extending out over a longer
period of time.  And oftentimes the individual, he or she really wants to get
working right away.  And what maybe they should do is just what you suggested,
they really should be getting more training, but there's often a reluctance to
do that, I would say, because you want to get back and you want to get
working.  And particularly these folks, they've been working as has already
been indicated. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  And if I understand it
correctly, do businesses have the ability to it, obviously, has to be a joint
relationship between the serviceman to go to school and to work.  But is there
any tools within the GI Bill that give them the ability to go to school, and is
there a benefit to an employer to employ them while they're going to school at
the same time under the GI Bill.

Mr. EVERSON.  I don't specifically
know the answer to that in terms of the GI Bill.  The constraints, though,
generally, look, we've got a big manufacturing base here.  A lot of this is
shift work.  There are particular times that somebody comes on, and that's true
in lots of businesses.  So there's an inherent tension and conflict as was
mentioned.  I thought the first panel, by the way, was excellent in terms of
the range of issues that were covered.  Issues are different for big businesses
versus small businesses. 

Small businesses you got ten employees.  It's
all hands on deck all the time.  And if somebody's off getting training even
afternoons or in the evening, it's tough to manage that.  And frankly, just the
overall economic difficulties are really what is making the most complex and
the most daunting, I would suggest to you. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  And I think we see the
same thing in the civilian world, as well, with adult education. 

Mr. EVERSON.  Yes. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Transitions that we're
seeing within our economy, the global competition that we face. 
Things are moving constantly.  But we do want to utilize and make sure that our
men and women that are coming out of the military, I mean, utilize those
benefits in the GI Bill as much as possible. 

Mr. EVERSON.  We certainly point them
in that direction if that's appropriate.  But again, each case has got a
complicated set of issues for the individual, the family.  We talked about the
disabilities.  Approximately, we think, about one in seven of the veterans who
come through to see us have a disability and one‑third of those have a
serious disability.  So all of this sort of plays together.  And if you want to
lay training on top of it, that can be a logistical challenge for the
individual. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Could you talk a little
bit about the work that's being done at Work One centers across the state. 
And, obviously, you are providing education and training.  But as far as
veterans coming into Work One facilities, can you kind of walk us through what
you see and hear. 

Mr. EVERSON.  Sure.  I think that,
again, we give the vets priority which means, even when they just come in, if
there's a queue or in terms of, as I talked about, the job board that we have. 
The dedicated resources that were mentioned earlier, and then by Mr. Tyler,
that's a great help because that's a dedicated resource.  That means that the
individual is not in competition, if you will, with other Work One personnel,
so they get the direct care and feeding of that individual. 

The other thing that happens that I think
makes this program a model frankly is those individuals are all vets
themselves.  They've got good contacts into the communities.  They know the
voluntary agencies that are working in this space, and they can make those
referrals.  They know the network.  So I think this is a pretty ‑‑
when I compare this to the average individual who has suffered a layoff, I
think the vets, because of this dedicated resource and the direct ties that our
folks have to the rest of the community and back into the guard or into the
veterans administration, all of that works pretty well.  The tough thing,
though, as we said, is all these complex challenges that these individuals face
and, again, the overall economy. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Mr. Tyler, one of the
primary responsibilities of DVOPS and LVERS is outreach into the employment
community and into businesses.  Can you give us an idea, there seems to be a
disconnect between a lot of, specifically, smaller businesses.  But we heard
from the first panel, and we constantly hear this, that there seems to be a lack
of information and what is available.  Can you tell us a little bit about what
are the DVOPS and LVERS doing to get that information out to businesses,
chambers, other entities. 

Mr. TYLER.  Yes, sir.  And that
question may also want to be addressed by Commissioner Everson in that the
structure of the Indiana Department of Workforce system is such that the LVERS
in the Work One employment service system work and are members of what are
called business services or business solutions teams, so that they are integrated
as part of the overall business services and employment outreach efforts on the
part of the individual one stop workforce centers throughout the state. 

And there is a concerted effort on the part
of these LVERS to go out and meet with the various chambers of commerce.  They
engage in seminars with the chambers of commerce.  We oftentimes see human
resource professionals who are representing their companies come to those
venues.  We are oftentimes invited to participate in those.  And not only does
it give us an opportunity, as the Veterans Employment Training Service, to
bestow the virtues of a veteran, you know, the 10 reasons to hire a veteran,
but also affords us the opportunity to talk about employer and company
responsibilities and USERRA and re‑employment matters. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Mr. Everson, would you like to comment?

Mr. EVERSON.  I guess one comment I
was going to make sort of gets at all this.  There is a distinct difference
between large employers and small employers.  62 people, that's a fair number
of folks doing this work.  It's dedicated, it's effective, but it has its
limits.  You're not going to be reaching out to somebody who's got 30 employees
unless you have a specific lead that says, geez, that fella's going to be great
with veterans.  There's just too much traffic going through there. 

So I thought Mr. Dobson's comments were very
interesting in terms of working with the Chamber.  We work very closely with
the Chamber at the state level.  I think that's an opportunity for more
communication. 

The other point I would make here that I
think underlies all of this were the comments by the mayor.  And I think
Secretary Gates has made much the same comment in terms of the disconnect
between the nation and the military at this stage of our country's evolution. 
Because of the reasons that the Lieutenant Colonel mentioned, we've got the
fourth largest guard.  We have a high penetration of veterans, I think the
situation here, in terms of appreciation of the role of the military is
probably rather more positive than in many parts of the country. 

Nevertheless, that's a real challenge now
with the war fatigue and this disconnect between service by a few or some and
not participation by others.  So that's another piece in here that just makes
this tougher in addition to all the traffic we have with these busy offices. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  What can you just tell
us, in general, and some specifics, if you can think of them, about the 3,000
unemployed Hoosier veterans, what they're dealing with, what they're looking
for, some of the experiences they have. 

Mr. EVERSON.  When I visited our
offices, I think that they do not stand out in terms of their approaches or
their problems.  If somebody's unemployed, they're unemployed, and they're all
looking for the same thing.  What the vets have, I think, we sort of got to
that at one point on the earlier panel, what they've got, what you mentioned,
Congressman, they've got the great soft skills, was what we call them.  As I
travel around meeting with employers across the state, sure there's a technical
skills gap that gets talked about again and again here.  That plays here.  That
does play because, as I mentioned before, vets don't necessarily match up on
the technical skills exactly.  You've got to bridge that gap.  But I think that
we probably don't do enough to emphasize the soft skills, the leadership
skills, the desire to get to work on time, to be a part of a team.  They can
take criticisms. 

If you talk to major employers and smaller
employers, as I do, they'll tell you they have a lot of attrition.  One of the
great challenges of this economy right now is, despite the high rates of
unemployment, we have many jobs that go unfilled because employers have a great
deal of difficulty finding someone who has those life skills, those soft
skills, that motivation to do work, and sometimes to do pretty tough work in
some of the factories or other areas.

And I think the vets braid out very well in
all those areas.  It's just a question of making the connections and then
selling them, if you will. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Lieutenant Colonel,
final question:  You mentioned you had 20 job fairs.  What kind of success have
you had with those?  Could you elaborate a little bit more on those. 

Colonel THOMAS.  My understanding is
we're averaging about a 50 percent placement rate across the entire state. 
These are very tough decisions that families have to make because these jobs
are all over the state.  In some cases they require a decision to pick up and
move to where the job is.  So through counseling, through our on‑staff
joint family services support professionals that counsel with these families
and our service men and women to make decisions, because sometimes it's not
just getting a job, but it often includes maybe picking up and moving, as
well.  We're experiencing about a 50 percent placement rate across the entire
state. 

I would say also, sir, that as we talk about
veterans, I'm here representing the National Guard even though we work with all
branches of the military in our state.  Inside the veteran population, the
National Guard servicemen and women and the Air National Guard, these are men
and women who are from within the community, started in the community, may have
deployed, come back to the community.  All the skills deficit we talked about
veterans not having, many of our guardsmen have all of these skills.  They are
teachers, and they are elected officials, and they are firemen, and they have
vast amounts of skills.  And so as I look at the veteran population,
unemployment impact on our veteran population, it impacts the National Guard
soldier as well, but the skill deficit, I wouldn't think that it's equally
distributed across because these are men and women, both Reserve and reserve
component, that started out in the community, deployed, and may come back to
the community as professionals and as laborers, and what have you. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Thank you. 

Mr. Braley. 

Mr. BRALEY.  Lieutenant Colonel, let's
follow up on that conversation.  I come from a state that has no military
bases, so most Iowan's contact with the sacrifices being made on our behalf
comes through the Iowa National Guard.  And we've talked a lot about the impact
of combat deployments on the employability of the Guard and Reserve, but I want
to get a little bit more specific. 

And I don't know if I just have bad luck, but
this has been my fifth year in congress.  When I was sworn in on January of
2007, the Iowa National Guard was part of the longest combat deployment of any
unit in Iraq.  And in less than a month after I was sworn, we had one of the
worst ice storms in our state's history that left 500,000 people without power
and the Guard was there. 

Colonel THOMAS.  Yes, sir. 

Mr. BRALEY.  During the 2008, demobilization from
Iraq, welcome home ceremonies.  We had the worst tornado in the United States
in my district and a week later the worst flooding in our state's history, and
the Guard was there. 

In 2010, we have more severe flooding, and we
have the largest deployment of our Guard since World War II to Afghanistan. 

In 2011, we have all the demobilization and
welcome home ceremonies at the same time the Missouri River is in the longest
sustained flood in the history of this country, and the Guard was there.  So we
know the concept of weekend warriors is a myth in the way our current military
engages the Guard and Reserve. 

How do those type of strains combined impact
the ability of somebody to keep a job when they're being called away all the
time or to get a job when they're employer is aware that all of those things
have been happening. 

Colonel THOMAS.  I think that first
recognizes or underscores the value of the National Guard in your state and in
all states and territories.  I would say that through partnerships, like with
the employment support of the Guard Reserve, the ESGR program, we cannot
sustain our National Guard employment percentages from climbing even higher
without those types of solid partnerships.  So if it wasn't for the great work
that the ESGR Program does with helping employers understand that these are
conditions outside of your employee's issue at this point ‑‑ and so
it's through solid partnerships, understanding, working, bridging strategies to
ensure that the servicemen and women, the Guardsmen can go and do it's job or
do his or her job and come back.  It's through partnerships.  It's through
partnerships. 

And it's recognizing employers who are going
the extra mile also.  And so as a commander,
what I tell my soldiers often is I need for you to help me
recognize your employers for the great job and sacrifice that they're also
making on behalf of this great state and our nation.  And so there are all
kinds of awards that we have, and opportunities we have to recognize their
sacrifice, as well.  But it's a partnership effort. 

Mr. BRALEY.  Well, and I'm glad you
brought that up because I went down to Camp Shelby as part of the pre‑deployment
train up with the Iowa National Guard before they went to Afghanistan.  And
while I was there it was in the middle of a Boss Lift program that brought a
lot of Iowa employers that were in ESGR down to observe their training to get a
better sense of what they were doing and the risk that they would be taking
while they were sent overseas. 

In your experience do programs like that help
educate employers about the value and importance of hiring employees who are
going to be called up and missing from work?

Colonel THOMAS.  Absolutely, sir, absolutely.  Without those
kind of programs, our employers know ‑‑ I think on the first panel there was
discussion about employers not really knowing how to even engage the military
community, the veteran community in this community.  So when the guard
reaches out to its employer population and brings them into training
opportunities, Boss Lift opportunities, it's for the specific purpose to educate these employers about what these servicemen and women
are going through.  And without those kinds of programs, it's hard for them to
understand and appreciate.  And I think stronger relationships are built from
those kinds of programs and creativity to better support our vets.  And it allows certain types of
organizations who decide to even support even on greater level, maybe even
financially to help a service members who's going through tough financial times
to give back to that effort, as well.  So just as employers are seeking to
support their employee and the military, they're also seeking in some cases to
go a little bit extra because they recognize the sacrifice, but we pull them in
through those kind of programs.  It's very, very beneficial. 

Mr. BRALEY.  Mr. Everson, when my
father came home from Iwo Jima there was no diagnostic category known as post‑traumatic
stress disorder.  He died in 1980, and 11 years later I learned for the first
time that he saw one of his best friends vaporized by a shell burst on Iwo Jima
and suffered from what we now know as post‑traumatic stress disorder. 
And I know that because he went through two severe bouts of depression when I
was in high school and college.  And I can tell you the people in my family
know who came and struggled with us during that period, and we know who
didn't. 

And you were good enough to raise the issue
of PTSD as a factor in the employability of many combat veterans, and it's
something we talk about a lot in Washington. 

Mr. EVERSON.  Right. 

Mr. BRALEY.  And I was at the hearing
at Walter Reed when General Shoomaker said, very publicly for the first time,
PTSD is real.  And I thanked him because of my personal background. 

Mr. EVERSON.  Right. 

Mr. BRALEY.  But we still have a huge
knowledge gap in this country.  There is still a huge stigma associated with a
diagnosis of PTSD. 

Mr. EVERSON.  Right. 

Mr. BRALEY.  And we have lot of
veterans with what is called mild traumatic brain injury, which sounds like it
ain't that bad, but can have profound impact on their ability to get and hold a
job. 

Mr. EVERSON.  Right. 

Mr. BRALEY.  So what should we be
doing to help educate potential employees who are veterans who may be suffering
from PTSD and TBI, and what should we be doing to help educate their employers
about the type of accommodations they may need and they deserve because of the
sacrifice they've made for us.

Mr. EVERSON.  This is such a tough
issue, and I'm not sure that I have any easy answers, but we see it in our
centers.  And if we have a vet who's coming in, he may choose to sit in the
back of the room to be participating in a training class.  We sensitize all of
our people to signals or just making sure they're not overly arbitrary as
sometimes bureaucrats can be and really work with the folks in a way that is
sensitized, let's say, to this issue.  I just think that this is something
where the country is evolving and that we just ‑‑ the reason I put
it in there is just, as you said, because I think it needs discussion and
prominence and education. 

That's about all I can say, sir. 

Mr. BRALEY.  Well, thank you.  One of
the things you also mentioned in your testimony was the impact in Indiana since
2007 manufacturing being down 18 percent. 

Mr. EVERSON.  Yes. 

Mr. BRALEY.  Well, according to the
Bureau of Labor Statistics, in the last decade we have lost 54,000
manufacturers nationwide, manufacturers not employees.  So when I'm back in
Waterloo, I'm privileged to have about half of John Deere's world‑wide
production in my district.  And a lot of my veteran friends are people who
worked in those factories coming out of Vietnam, coming back from World War II
and Korea. 

Mr. EVERSON.  Right. 

Mr. BRALEY.  Those opportunities don't
exist the same way that they used to, do they.

Mr. EVERSON.  No, they don't.  This
gets a little out of my lane, so I don't want to be brushed back by the
Governor later if I've said something that's out of my channel.  But
nevertheless, in terms of economic policy, I think it's absolutely essential
that the country and the Congress emphasize manufacturing because it creates
jobs. 

Mr. BRALEY.  I agree with you. 

Mr. EVERSON.  I'm going to live in a
home in Indianapolis.  I've got a condo.  I can rent that.  I can own that. 
They're not moving where I live to China.  But you can move a lot of those
manufacturing facilities to China, so we should be doing everything we can to
incent manufacturing and activities like that that are good strong jobs through
things like the R and D credit.  Recognition I would suggest to you, again, we
talk here about the differentiation between big and small employers.  Small
employers have taken it particularly hard during this recession emphasizing
things that are of value to small employers I think is of great importance as
you both operate as members beyond the jurisdiction of the veterans community. 

Mr. BRALEY.  Well, and the reason why
that's important, I agree a hundred percent with you, that when we talk about
our manufacturing policy in this country, we have to understand it has a huge
impact on veterans because many veterans work in manufacturing facilities. 

Mr. EVERSON.  Absolutely. 

Mr. BRALEY.  And the other thing we
forget is that there are a lot of parts suppliers, small manufacturers around
Waterloo, Iowa that produce component parts for John Deere and also produce
component parts for the automotive industry and Detroit, and those are small
businesses, many of them, and so this all tends to come back together. 

Mr. EVERSON.  Yes. 

Mr. BRALEY.  But the reason we're here
today is not to talk about a broader economic policy, but how these things
combined together impact the employability of veterans. 

Mr. EVERSON.  I agree with you a
hundred percent; however, you've got to fix the whole to fix this part.  The
veterans are not going ‑‑ you're just not going to construct
something where the veterans are going to get jobs, and nobody else is going to
get jobs. 

Mr. BRALEY.  Absolutely.  And I don't
think veterans are asking for that. 

Mr. EVERSON.  And I'm not suggesting
they are. 

Mr. BRALEY.  Mr. Tyler, I wanted to
talk to you just briefly about your Homeless Vets Reintegration Program. 
That's another one of those things that we like to push off into the corner and
not think about because it makes us feel uncomfortable but the reality is we
have far too many homeless veterans in this country.  And one of the factors
can be if you don't have a job, it's hard to have a home.  And a lot of times
that's when families break down, is because of the lack of economic security. 
What's been your experience with that and how does that relate to what we're
talking about here today.

Mr. TYLER.  Yes, homelessness is a
national concern.

Many of the homeless individuals also have
been, you know, incarcerated.  That's part of the problem, too.  Finding
employers that are willing and ready to commit time and resource to working,
you know, with a homeless person or a person who is educationally or
economically, you know, disadvantaged in that particular state is an issue. 

We've worked quite closely with the Indiana
Housing and Community Development Authority on the state Homeless Planning Commission.  We've
worked with the Indy Connect Annual Fair which we bring together at the
Indianapolis, Indiana Convention Center with various groups and offer multiple
services for a homeless person.  The concern for a homeless person, whether
they're a veteran or not, is of a comprehensive nature.  You know, they're
dealing with probably a personal concern with alcoholism, perhaps drug abuse. 
Oftentimes, they have lost their driver's license.  You know, they may have
been suffering for years, Vietnam veterans, with post‑traumatic stress
disorder and not know it and have a problem getting to the VA, no
transportation.  You know, they're separated from their families.  So it's
important to avail multiple services, wrap‑around services for veterans
or any individual in a homeless situation, and to do as much as we can to
prevent homelessness, to catch and do what we can with, perhaps, financial
management, with some kind of economic assistance.  You know, when folks are
borderline, they're not able to make their house payments, to be able to
intervene, as soon as possible, in those kind of endeavors, also affording them
with some type of legal assistance, okay, that can overcome a particular
barrier that is posing as a challenge for them to really get a job. 

Mr. BRALEY.  Thank you. 

I yield back. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Thank you.  As Mr.
Everson and Mr. Braley started to talk economic policy I was about ready to
loosen my tie and order pizza.  We could be here probably the rest of the day. 

Mr. EVERSON.  I'm sorry, I apologize. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  No, no, because it is
all intertwined. 

Mr. EVERSON.  It is. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Specifically with
veterans, the economy and policies that we have broadly across the country do
affect this issue, very much so. 

Mr. TYLER, I did have one question and I want
to go back to something that Mayor Handshoe said earlier, and she talked about
her husband's situation and how he was denied employment. 

Mr. TYLER.  Yes. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Would you see that as a
violation of USERRA.

Mr. TYLER.  Yes, yes.  As it appears,
yes. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  What are you doing
under the forces.

Mr. TYLER.  What we're trying to do,
we work quite closely ‑‑ of course, in Indiana we're fortunate to
have a very close relationship with the Employer Support for the Guard and
Reserve for the Indiana community.  Service members, particularly those
returning to their jobs, who believe they may have a problem, you know, on the
job or getting back to their position that they left prior to deployment, you
know, we encourage them to touch base with the employment services for the
guard and reserve, to contact that employer toward arriving at a resolution.

There's always education that is needed, you
know, at some level, at some level throughout, you know, the employer or the
company. 

We try to avail ourselves to as many forums
and opportunities of chambers of commerce to talk about their responsibilities
under the law but to also, in so doing, let them know that, as a federal
official myself, as an investigator, a USERRA investigator, that we understand,
different from when I was in Vietnam, served 365 days and came home, that
today's service members are deploying on multiple occasions, and that is rough
on, particularly, the smaller industries.  So in addition to, you know, trying
to educate, trying to participate in various forums in which we can talk with
the employers, we also want them to understand that, while we recognize, you
know, that they support, you know, protection of our country, and that they
will give time off, you know, to their employees to participate in drills and
to go off overseas that, you know, we understand that it is a strain.  They
have those responsibilities, but we want to be able to talk and communicate. 
Oftentimes, as a regulator, it is difficult, you know, for us to get before the
employer community. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Thank you.  And I want
to thank you as a panel for being here today.  I know you have a tough job, but
we are counting on you and all that you do.  We want to thank you though for
your service, as well.  This completes our hearing.  I just want to say to
Indiana's veterans that the House Committee on Veteran Affairs Chairman, Jeff
Miller from Florida, has challenged us and has a goal to reduce veteran
employment to 5 percent or less.  I know it's a tall order, but it's a goal I
think that is worthy and one that, hopefully, we can be successful at and that
we'll see better economic times for all of us. 

I want to also mention too last week our
colleague who serves on the Veterans' Affairs Committee, Tim Walz from
Minnesota, had a bill that passed the House of Representatives that finally
recognizes the contributions of our Guard and our Guard Reservist retirees as
veterans.  Who would have thought?  I didn't even realize that until he brought
that forward, but I think it's very well deserved and want to thank all our
veterans in every branch of the military. 

And then, finally, I saw her here earlier, I
don't know if she's still here, but Tina Acosta was here a little bit ago, and
she is with Turnstone Center here in Fort Wayne.  And she testified in front of
our committee. 

Tina, there you are.  Hi.  Thanks for being
here. 

But she testified in our committee regarding
the U.S.  Paralympic program and the work that they do at Turnstone, and she
shared a story of a special person who's here with us today, I believe, Tim
Leonard.  And he is from Fort Wayne.  And he returned home without the use of
his legs.  But he has been successful as an athlete and he has qualified for
the Midwest Valor games, and he is Indiana's one representative, I believe. 
And so we are very proud to have him here with us today.  Look forward to
shaking your hand. 

Are you a shot putter?

Mr. LEONARD.  Just one question.  I
already went to the Midwest games, I've already placed gold.  It's the veterans
games next summer that I've just also qualified for. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  Congratulations.  Thank
you.  Are you a shot putter.

Mr. LEONARD.  Shot putter and
powerlifter. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  I was going to say,
that arm looks big.  Congratulations.  We are very, very proud of you, and we
wish you the very best of success. 

So with that, I want to thank Congressman
Braley.  I had a great tenderloin in Cedar Falls, Iowa.  I saw King Gyros had a
special on tenderloin, feel free to stop by there.  Thank you for being here. 
And do you have any closing comments?

Mr. BRALEY.  Well, thank you, Mr.
Chairman.  It was an honor for me to be here in Indiana today, and I'm going to
say something shocking.  Chairman Stutzman and I are good friends.  He's a
Republican.  I'm a Democrat.  When I found out I was going to have the
honor of working with him on this committee, the first thing I said to him is
what can I do to help you be successful because, when it comes to serving our
nation's veterans, there is nothing that should be more non‑partisan than
helping our veterans in every way that we can, and that's why I am so proud to
serve with him.  I like Marlin.  I think he likes me, and, you know, I
think that you rarely see that on TV these days.  And it happens a lot more
than you think.  And I think if we did more hearings like this and spent
more time outside Washington talking to real people whose lives are impacted by
the policies we set, we'd all be better off.  And I'm just very honored to
be here with you today.  So thank you. 

Mr. STUTZMAN.  I want to thank you,
Mr. Braley, as well. 

And I do like him.  And I think that he and I
both have an understanding that the challenges that we face as Americans aren't
Republican problems or Democrat.  They're American problems, and we have to
address them as Americans because the rest of the world wants to have what we
have, and that is they also want to destroy our way of life.  There are also
those who do want to destroy our way of life.  We need to protect America
because we do live in the greatest nation. 

I just want to say I ask unanimous consent
that members have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their
remarks.  Hearing no objection, ordered. 

Once again, thank you for coming.  Thank you
to each of you on the panel for your testimony.  Thank you again to our
veterans, and this concludes the committee hearing.

[Whereupon, at 12:15 p.m., the subcommittee
was adjourned.]


APPENDIX


Prepared Statement of Hon.
Marlin Stutzman, Chairman, Subcommittee on
Economic Opportunity

Good morning. Usually when we hold hearings, we are
sitting in Washington.  Today, I am delighted to be here in Fort Wayne. 
Northeast Indiana is home to 48,000 veterans.  These men and women have served
our nation with honor, and it is my honor to serve as their voice in Congress
on the House Veterans Affairs Committee.  In Chairing the Subcommittee on
Economic Opportunity, I have the opportunity on working on veterans employment
and education issues alongside  the Ranking Member of this subcommittee, the
Honorable Bruce Braley, who represents Iowa’s  First Congressional District. 
Earlier this week he hosted me in Waterloo, Iowa where we were able to hear
from many Iowa veterans.  I am happy to introduce him to you today and welcome
him to Fort Wayne.

Ft. Wayne has a long history beginning with settlements by
Native Americans in the area followed by a fort built by General Mad Anthony
Wayne in the 1790s.  Since then, Ft. Wayne has played an important role in
Indiana’s history and is known for its manufacturing, education, insurance,
health care, logistics, and defense and security.  Ft.
Wayne has been named an All American City on three occasions, most recently in
2009.

We are here today to hear from Hoosiers about the employment
difficulties facing far too many members of the Indiana National Guard, the
Reserves, and those returning from active duty.  While the unemployment rate
for all Indiana veterans in September was 6.9 percent, data from the Bureau of
Labor Statistics show that 35.6 percent of America’s Gulf Era II veterans ages
20 to 24 were unemployed, while 8.8 percent of Gulf Era II veterans ages 25-54
were unemployed.

More shocking is anecdotal information that as much as 30
percent of returning members of the Guard and Reserves do not come home to a
job.  Clearly, we need to find ways to reduce all of those numbers.  The House
Committee on Veterans' Affairs has taken a first step toward that end last week
by passing H.R. 2433, a bill that would provide up to a year of GI Bill
benefits to unemployed veterans between the ages of 35 and 60.  The bill now
goes to the Senate and we hope to get the bill to the President by Veterans Day
along with several other improvements to veterans benefits.

I want to take a moment to explain that this meeting is a
formal hearing to be inserted into the official Congressional record.  In
keeping with the standard protocol of official committee hearings, we will not
be taking questions from the audience during the hearing.  I am pleased so many
of you are here today and I look forward to speaking to you, answering
questions, and listening to your comments and concerns after the conclusion of
this hearing in the main hallway.

Again, I am delighted to be with you today and I will now
yield to the gentleman whose office is next to mine, the distinguished Ranking
Member of the Subcommittee, my good friend, the Honorable Bruce Braley.

Prepared Statement of Hon. Bruce L. Braley, Ranking
Member, Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity

I
would like to thank Chairman Stutzman for inviting us to the great state of Indiana.  Great to be in the Midwest where the genuine people remind me of being back
in my home state of Iowa.  We are honored to be able to hear first hand
the concerns of hard working Americans and heroes who sacrifice so much for our
country.  We have a great list of people providing testimony and I look
forward to hearing from your constituents and how we can help improve
conditions for all our nation’s veterans.  

Today's
field hearing will provide us the opportunity to review existing programs that
help veterans secure employment; discuss recruiting and retention tools; and
review barriers to employment. 

I
hope our panelists will provide insight into the shortfalls of federal and
state programs while providing specific recommendations for us to consider to
help improve veteran employment. I know that we have a poor economy but our
veterans have acquired first rate skills that should be highly sought after by
employers.  We need to help our veterans translate their experiences and help
employers understand the value of these skills.  Hiring veterans is a win
for the employer because they get a top notch employee with a strong sense of
dedication and a win for the community because it decreases veteran
unemployment. 

Let
me be very clear, we have been and remain committed to getting our nation's
veterans back to work.  This is not a VA issue, or a local issue, it is a
national issue that demands our attention right now.  This is why we have
come together in a bi-partisan manner and pledge to work to address the
employment needs of our nation's veterans. 

I
want to thank everyone for being here today and I look forward to hearing
today's testimony. 

Mr.
Chairman, Thank you for having us here in Indiana and I yield back.

Prepared Statement of Hon. W. Suzanne Handshoe, Mayor,
Kendallville, IN

Congressman
Stutzman,

Thank you for
the opportunity to be here today to discuss the very important issue of
Veterans employment.

I would like
to share some of my own experiences both good and bad and those of family
members.

First, I am a
retired Marine Corps Chief Warrant Officer Four.  When I returned to
Kendallville after Desert Storm the economy was weak and jobs were not easy to
find.  I found a job as a temporary at Kraft foods while I worked on my
degree. 

During the mid
1990's while an active Marine Corps Reservist and Desert Storm Veteran, I
applied for a position as a case worker with the Department of Family and
Children.  During the interview process I was asked if I had to attend any
training that would require me to be absent.  I explained that I would be gone
for a minimum of two weeks training usually in the summer months and
occasionally maybe longer to attend educational requirements of my rank.

I was flatly
told that it would be unfair to the other members of the staff to pick up my case
load for two weeks plus two weeks of vacation.  It just wouldn't be fair.

Needless to
say I did not get the job.

The North
East Indiana Special Education Cooperative hired me because I was a Marine. The
Executive Director was a former Marine and felt I could handle any challenge he
threw my way.  When I was activated in 2003 for Operation Enduring Freedom, as
a Casualty Assistance Officer, they held my position and were extremely
supportive of not only me but my family.

As Mayor, we
have had a Councilman deploy twice in the past few years to Afghanistan and
Iraq.  We supported him in any way we could during his absence.  We also had a
Firefighter activated for duty in Afghanistan.  Obviously his position was held
and welcomed him back to our ranks upon his return.  The City of Kendallville
was recently awarded the Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve “Above and
Beyond Award” for our support shown to our military members.

A great story
of patriotism is my brother in law he is employed by Graphic Packaging in
Kendallville.  He joined the Army due to the events of September 11th
and served for 5 years with 3 combat tours.  When he was Honorably Discharged,
Graphic Packaging not only gave him his job back, they gave him the five years
seniority of his service time.

Shouldn't we
be recognizing or rewarding companies who follow these actions?

Last year my
husband, Randy Handshoe interviewed for a teaching position at a Middle School,
the panel looked at his resume and commented that he was in the Navy Reserve. He
answered “that is correct”.  One of the members then asked “Does this mean you
could be deployed?”  He responded with “yes, every person that wears a uniform
has this risk".  The next comment was, “Where would that leave us?" Needless to
say he was not hired.

Randy did
receive orders several months later and was called to duty December 26th
2010 and is still serving as a Chief Petty Officer with the Staff Judge
Advocates office in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

What is
troubling to me is that he will return at Christmas with no job, and he holds a
Bachelor's Degree in Education.

I'm certain
that I have other constituents that are having trouble finding work, or worse,
not being offered work because they are reservists who have seen multiple
deployments or the threat exists they will be called to duty.

 As the war
continues it is no longer fashionable to support our military members. Perhaps
some consideration should be given to incentivize companies through tax
credits, who do hire Veterans.  

Respectfully.

Prepared Statement of Mark A. Dobson, President,
Warsaw-Kosciusko County Chamber of Commerce, Warsaw, IN

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The
attached document reflects the information obtained by the Warsaw-Kosciusko
County Chamber of Commerce in relation to Veteran’s Unemployment.  Nearly 30
businesses and a local College contributed to the information obtained.  The
consistent messages heard from businesses regarding barriers to employing
veterans were:

  • ECONOMIC
    CONSTRAINTS CAUSED BY A SAGGING ECONOMY
  • LACK OF
    BUSINESS ENGAGEMENT WITH MILITARY
  • TRANSITIONAL
    TRAINING FOR VETERANS

There
are rolls and responsibilities for all of us in resolving this issue.  Chambers
of Commerce across the Country are an invaluable resource to help solve the
challenge.  A higher level of engagement by interested parties is needed to
ensure that Veterans are seen as the very valuable employment resource they
are.  The testimony given today will outline a few steps we believe will help
break down barriers for our Country’s brightest and best.


Good
Morning.  Congressman Stutzman & Honorable members in attendance today - thank
you for holding this Congressional Sub-Committee hearing in Ft. Wayne.  That you hold this hearing shows our Veterans how much America values their service
to our Country.  I am humbled and honored to be here to speak on this most
important issue. 

The
issue of Veterans' Unemployment is one that distresses all of us.  Our Country's
brightest and best have given of themselves so that we may continue to enjoy
the freedoms granted to us by our forefathers.  They have stepped forward and
heeded the call to duty.  For that we are all grateful.  And so now we are
compelled to do all we can to ensure Veterans take their rightful place in the
private sector.

The
dichotomy here is that Veterans desire no special treatment.  They do not wish
to have opportunity handed to them.  They, more than any of us in the room,
understand what America stands for.  They will carve a significant path in
society.  It is our duty to help break down any barriers and help our Veterans
transition to the private sector. 

With
these thoughts in mind I contacted businesses in Kosciusko County to gain a deeper understanding of the barriers
and challenges of hiring Veterans.  Input
was received from nearly 30 businesses.  Additionally Grace College's Assistant Registrar / Veterans Services Officer provided invaluable information that
helped form the basis of my testimony today.

The
consistent feedback received from our Business Community is the gratefulness
for the Veterans military service.  All expressed their appreciation for our
Veterans.  Additionally, comments indicated that many companies value the specialized
training obtained in the military.  They value the discipline and level of
responsibility that a former serviceman displays on the job. 

So,
we dug deeper to understand why there is an unemployment issue.  I believe it
breaks down into three main categories:

  • ECONOMIC
    CONSTRAINTS CAUSED BY A SAGGING ECONOMY
  • LACK OF BUSINESS ENGAGEMENT WITH MILITARY
  • TRANSITIONAL
    TRAINING FOR VETERANS

The
Economic Constraints are reflected by the state of our economy today.  Sustained
unemployment continues to be near historical highs.  Additionally, the
uncertainty of the economy has companies putting off hiring decisions until
there is a clear direction which way we are headed.  In a climate where
unemployment averages over 9%, job seekers see greater competition for any
available opening.  Arguably the training received in the military is a
competitive advantage.  But that advantage is diminished by the large number of
people seeking the same job.

The
Private Sector's engagement with the military is an additional challenge. 
Businesses do not have Knowledge of the availability of Veterans.  Or the
contact points to know where to find available Veterans.  They don't know when a
Vet will be available for employment.  When a deployment ends, or a Veteran retires,
the private sector is unaware of their availability.  Or the notice comes after
significant hiring decisions have been completed.

Finally,
another consistent comment was that while Veterans' training is excellent, the
transitional skills are not up to par.  Quite often Veterans need assistance
with Resume Development, Interviewing Skills, & Transitional Job Training. 
Some military functions are easily relatable to their civilian counterparts. 
It is easy to understand what skills a Military Aircraft Mechanic might bring
to the table.  But some Military duties are hard to translate to the private
sector.  If the job description from the military has one "blowing up stuff",
the private sector employer may not understand how they can use those same
skills. 

So
what can we do to help?  The United States has transitional programs available
to their Veterans – but we can all do more:

  1. The Post 9/11 GI Bill is a
    wonderful program to help transition Veterans to the private sector.  However,
    how much more effective would that program be if there was engagement with
    Community Development entities.  Chambers of Commerce, Economic Development
    Agencies, WorkOne's and other entities charged with community development are
    the best resources for understanding the job market in a particular community. 
    As an example, our Chamber maintains a jobs database, has a partnership
    arrangement for assisting with placement of trailing spouses, and routinely
    surveys the business community to understand what skills are needed in the
    workforce.  So, if one were to characterize the needs in Kosciusko County, there is a strong need for advanced production workers, skilled machinists, advanced
    welding, and bio-engineers.  We are the Orthopedic Capital of the World, home
    to the largest screen manufacturer in the world, and are one of Indiana's most productive agricultural regions.  Think of what a useful resource we can be
    for those who council Veterans on what skills they should train for with their
    GI Bill for jobs in Kosciusko County.  We recommend that those engaged in
    transitioning Veterans become involved with entities such as ours at a greater
    level.
  1. Advance communications with
    entities such as the local Chambers when deployments are ending – or there are
    significant numbers of Veterans returning to our community.  The sooner we can
    communicate with our local businesses, the better prepared the business
    community will be to assist with employment issues.  I acknowledge this is a
    challenge.  The military doesn't want to divulge when troops will be leaving a
    region.  But businesses make large hiring decisions up to a year in advance. 
    Better lead times mean a better chance that businesses will look to the pool of
    returning Vets as potential hires.
  1. The US Chamber has launched the
    Hiring Our Heroes initiative.  This initiative is a commitment by the US
    Chamber & Local Chambers throughout the Country to connect 100,000 veterans
    and their spouses to jobs through local Chambers in 100 communities throughout
    the Country.  Our Chamber will be hosting such a job fair in early 2012.  So,
    we should ask, how strong is the relationship between those who help Veterans transition
    to the private sector & the Chambers of Commerce throughout the United States?  Are Chambers looked to as a resource for those involved with Veteran
    transition as a resource to help?  Chambers exist because we serve our
    members.  One of the most important things we do is engage on Workforce issues.

I
want to thank this committee for hearing testimony today.  As I said before, I
am honored to speak on this issue.  Simple words of appreciation cannot express
the gratitude I feel for those who chose to protect our freedoms.  I was taught
that actions speak louder than words.  It is only through action can we all
truly express our gratitude to those who have defended our freedoms.

Respectfully submitted.

Prepared Statement of Michael S. Landram, President and
Chief Executive Officer, Greater Fort Wayne Chamber of Commerce, Fort Wayne, IN

Thank you Mr. Chairman
and Members of the Subcommittee.  My name is Mike Landram.  I am President and
CEO of the Greater Fort Wayne Chamber of Commerce.  We are the third largest
Chamber in Indiana with over 1700 members who do a total of $18 billion of business
in over 750 industries in Northeast Indiana.

The Greater Fort Wayne
Chamber of Commerce is very involved in veteran's affairs issues.  In addition
to having veteran-owned businesses as members, we are heavily engaged in
advancing the defense industry in northeast Indiana.

Like the rest of the
country, we are acutely aware of the employment struggles veterans are faced
with.  We have a unique insight into that issue due to the large National Guard
base in Fort Wayne.  We are in regular communication with the base on issues
facing their Guardsmen and are actively pursuing programs to fight unemployment
among veterans.

The Greater Fort Wayne
Chamber of Commerce is a charter member of the Northeast Indiana Defense
Industry Association Board (NIDIA).  NIDIA’s Membership is comprised of
businesses, higher education, Congressional staffers, all working toward a
common goal: funding the defense industry and providing regional support and
promotion for the industry and the contributions made to the defense industry
in Fort Wayne.

Secondly workforce
development is a critical concern for the defense cluster. Many of the members
of NIDIA have worked together to define their future staffing needs.  Due to
the aging engineer workforce, engineers in many specialized areas will be
retiring.  Members of NIDIA worked very closely in a collaborative fashion to
communicate these skill needs with their university partners as a way to ensure
future graduates will meet industry needs.

Additionally many small
businesses in Northeast Indiana have started and serve within the supply chain
for the defense industry.  For example, the NIDIA group conducted a member expo
as a way for the various small business members to describe their products and
services to the defense members. At monthly NIDIA meetings presentations are
done by businesses to the Board that outline how the businesses can work
collaboratively with the defense industry in hiring and employing veterans.

Lastly Northeast
Indiana established PTAC (Procurement Technical Assistance Center) in 2009. 
The PTAC serves as an advisor to businesses informing them how to qualify
themselves in doing business with government.

In addition to our
involvement with NIDIA, our Chamber is assisting the National Guard base with
implementing a STARBASE program in Fort Wayne.  STARBASE is geared towards
elementary students, mainly fifth graders, to expose them to STEM.  These
students are traditionally at-risk students.  The program encourages their
learning in areas of academics that are historically under-represented in
STEM.  Military volunteers from “National Guard, Navy, Marine, Air Force
Reserve and Air Force bases across the nation work with students to set and
achieve goals by applying abstract principles to real world situations”[1].  STARBASE is a perfect example of
the investment we can make in the young people of our society in the hopes that
they will take this experience and apply it to whatever field they choose to
pursue.

We know the issue of
unemployment among veterans is an issue that will continue for the
unforeseeable future, given our current economic state.  To that end, our
Chamber, along with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, is planning on hosting a
Hiring Our Hoosiers event in Fort Wayne in the next year.  The scheduling of
this event has not been set due to the uncertainty of the deployment schedule
in our area.  These events benefit not only veterans, but are open to their
spouses as well.  The issues Veterans face concerning employment are
substantial.  As home to a National Guard base, we hear stories of soldiers
deployed, only to return to jobs that have been downsized or eliminated.  At
the same time, in this double dip recession, their spouses are having trouble
maintaining employment.  While these issues are not unique to veterans, they
are exacerbated by their inability to determine their schedule.

As part of our
commitment to furthering the advancement of the military in Fort Wayne, I sit
as Secretary of the newly formed Fort Wayne Base Community Council.  Our purpose
is as stated: to continue and improve the outstanding relationship between the
civilian community and the military service community centered around Fort
Wayne, Indiana; and to promote the general welfare, prosperity, and quality of
life between military and civilian populations.  By being involved with this
Council, our goal is to partner businesses and military in order to create a
mutually beneficial partnership among them.

In closing, our focus
is not confined to working in our community.   We are also engaged at the State
level in legislation that will benefit Veterans. During the 2011 General
Assembly, our Chamber supported State Representative Tom Dermody's bill, House
Bill 1183, to study the effects of a 3% price preference for veteran-owned
businesses in Indiana.  It was assigned to the Commission on Military and
Veterans Affairs for study in the interim.  We know that, while small, this is
an important step forward for Veterans and a step in the right direction in
addressing the unemployment issues among them.  In addition to supporting this
bill, our Chamber was instrumental in getting one of our Members, Jerry Hogan,
a veteran and business owner in northeast Indiana, appointed to the Commission
to ensure that Veterans were getting the most benefit from the price
preference.

If the Greater Fort
Wayne Chamber of Commerce can be of any assistance in this important fight, I
encourage you to call on us.  Thank you again for your time and attention to
this significant matter. 


[1]
DoD STARBASE. (2011). Program Description. Retrieved from: http://www.starbasedod.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=66&Itemid=60

Prepared Statement of
Gregg Norris, Human Resources Manager, BAE Systems, Electronic Systems Sector,
Fort Wayne, IN

Chairman Stutzman,
Ranking Member Braley, and distinguished members of the Subcommittee.  As a
representative of an employer of nearly 1000 employees in Northeast Indiana, I
appreciate the opportunity to discuss with you the experiences we have had in
recruiting and employing nearly 100 veterans into our business.

About our Company

My name is Gregg Norris and I am the Human Resources manager
for the BAE Systems facility in Fort Wayne, Indiana.  BAE Systems is a global defense
and security company with approximately 100,000 employees worldwide.  The
Company delivers a full range of products and services for air, land and naval
forces, as well as advanced electronics, security, information technology
solutions and support services.  Our division serves the aerospace and defense
community with capabilities and products that improve operational safety and
enhance mission effectiveness.

At our Fort Wayne
facility, we manufacture a variety of both commercial and defense electronics for
avionics applications.  Our workforce is comprised of approximately 650 union
represented hourly production workers with the balance of 300 support personnel
in various disciplines including engineering, finance, operations, and supply
chain management.  Our Company (including legacy owners) has been in Fort Wayne
since 1985.

We have been very
fortunate to be able to grow the Fort Wayne business from just over 700
employees in 2004 to a planned population of nearly 1000 by the end of 2011.  
In addition to this growth, there has been significant attrition as a result of
many of our employees retiring.  Consequently, we have hired nearly 500
employees over the past five years.  Veteran hiring has played a significant
role in the success of this effort.

Veteran Hiring

Local hiring
efforts that focus on veteran hiring include participation in the BAE
Systems Corporate Warrior Integration Program which I will describe more fully
later.  We reach a large military audience through advertising all
of the Fort Wayne openings on Vetjobs.com. Career
Builder's Talent Network is also utilized which reaches 98% of
transitioning military through their partnerships with the top military
job boards, Department of Veteran Affairs, and the primary social
media source - Facebook.  BAE Systems participates in a variety of
Corporate Gray hiring career fairs across the country including last
year's participation in Chicago where Fort Wayne employees
attended.  As I mentioned earlier, currently about 10% of our employee
population are veterans, including 12 new veterans hired this year.

When we consider
veterans during our recruiting process, we feel there are many positive skill
sets that these individuals automatically offer our Company.   Two of the
talents that service men and women offer immediately as a result of their
military experiences are teamwork and a sense of self-discipline.   It is
critical to our business that we have employees with the necessary skills to
effectively work together.  Like the military, for us to be successful, we must
all work together toward a common goal or mission. 

The discipline that is
instilled in soldiers as part of their military background is also a strongly
desired employee attribute.  We need people that show up for work, arrive on
time, support our leadership, and have a strong sense of respect for
themselves, their coworkers and the Company's values; all characteristics we
typically find in our veterans.

The Wounded Warrior
Program

It is my pleasure to
have with me today, James Rodriquez.  James is the Director of BAE Systems' Warrior Integration Services.  BAE System's Warrior Integration Program has
been very successful and I would like to share some information about the
program with you today. 

Although there are
challenges facing veterans with disabilities as they return to the workforce,
there are a variety of organizations and businesses within the country who are
working diligently at assisting veterans to overcome these obstacles and BAE
Systems is one of them.  The employees of BAE
Systems have resolved to positively impact these issues and to directly enhance
the transition of our veterans and Wounded Warriors by establishing a Warrior
Integration Program. The defining word in our Warrior Integration Program is
INTEGRATION
.  We are integrating veterans, Wounded Warriors, and their
families into a company that can serve as an extension of their military
careers.   The program provides employment positions with which they can
identify and still maintain a connection with supporting their former soldiers,
sailors, airmen, Coast Guardsmen and Marines.  The value of service that these
young men and women bring to our workforce is immeasurable.  Due to their
unique set of military skills, training, and leadership experience, they bring
a new perspective to the way we do business and the products we build.  It is a
worthy and necessary investment to actively find ways to employ Wounded
Warriors within BAE Systems and to dispel the perception that they are not
employable.  In order to do this, our business leaders from the
corporate senior leadership team to the first line supervisors have chosen to
take a leading role in the implementation, and sustainment of the program. 
From the beginning of our program initiative in 2008 to the current Warrior
Integration Services we have today, we have known that our success in this
great endeavor depends on two words - leadership and education.  We have
successfully established a supportive infrastructure within BAE Systems for our
Warriors which adds to our talent pipeline, strengthens our customer
connections, enhances our military charity partner relationships, and extends
our view of diversity and inclusionIn essence, our employment
position fundamentally provides mission-centered work with which the veteran
can identify, contribute, and be passionate.  It also provides an opportunity
for career progression and growth. 

We
have the opportunity to make a positive impact on the lives of these young men
and women by creating employment opportunities in an uncertain environment. BAE
Systems is committed to assisting our nation’s heroes with a new uniform and
the same commitment to which they are accustomed.  The Warrior Integration
Program has had a dramatic impact on the veterans' abilities to successfully
transition to the workforce after their military service.  It has also made a
positive impact on the business and the stability of the veterans' families. 

BAE Systems
Military Leave Policies

BAE
Systems Military Leave policies exceed federal legal requirements in supporting
its employees who serve in the military. Employees who are actively serving in
the military are eligible to receive a military pay differential that covers
the difference between military pay and their regular BAE Systems salary. 
Reservists on duty for annual training may receive up to two weeks of
differential pay, and employees called to active duty may receive up to six
months of differential pay.  Additionally, if applicable, we are able to
implement a flexible work schedule to allow for mandatory medical appointments
for veterans and Wounded Warriors.  In these specific instances, alternate
shifts serve to accommodate absences.  Medical appointments can be attended
during non-working hours and the veteran or Wounded Warrior can be assured his
or her employment within the business remains intact while they serve our
country at home or overseas.

Recommendations

In terms of
recommendations that I would offer to the committee, based on feedback from our
recruiting team, I would first and foremost encourage continued focus on
education and opportunities for Veterans to return to
school.  Many of the positions within BAE Systems require college
degrees which can be an obstacle for veterans.  Although the majority of our
positions are hourly associates in Fort Wayne and require only a high school
diploma, post secondary educational experiences can still be of great value to
a veteran candidate in differentiating themselves from a very large pool of
potential candidates.  Although the Fort Wayne site is a manufacturing
location, most of our salaried support positions require technical degrees
typically in electrical and mechanical engineering.

As I considered other
recommendations, I thought it might be beneficial if I spoke with a veteran
that we recently hired.  For purposes of this testimony I will refer to our
veteran employee as Bruce.  Bruce is an 11-year veteran who served in both
Afghanistan and Iraq.  He served in multiple capacities including his final
duty as lead security for his executive officer.  Bruce saw extensive combat
action while in theater and was eventually released from duty in 2007 due to
severe injuries he had sustained.  It gave me a profound sense of gratitude and
honor to listen to Bruce describe the sacrifices he had made for our country. 

I asked Bruce how he
heard about our job openings and why he had applied for one of our positions. 
He told me that he had maintained a close relationship with his former
executive officer who had retired from the military and taken a position with
BAE Systems in Fayetteville, Georgia.  Bruce's former executive officer had
recommended BAE Systems as a strong company with good values.  Bruce also
recalled several instances of BAE Systems' equipment that he had used while on
active duty.  Bruce then did an internet search on BAE Systems and found our
production associate job posting online. He applied, met all of the selection
criteria and joined our team on August 29th this year.

I then asked Bruce what
recommendations he might have for the subcommittee.  Bruce hesitated a long
moment and he said, “Tell them I would describe how I felt when I left the
service in one word - helplessness.”  Bruce went on to tell me that he vividly
recalls receiving his military paperwork and being told he was free to leave;
but he had no idea what to do next.   He had been provided some resume building
assistance but he had no idea where or how to start finding a job, let alone a
career.

After listening to
Bruce's story, I would respectfully recommend some attention be given to what
is provided in the way of outplacement services for our veterans.   Resume
building is one small piece of this process.  There is, however, so much more in
the way of career counseling provided by outplacement companies.  These
services would provide immeasurable benefit to our veterans.  BAE Systems uses
similar companies to provide this much needed service for our employees that
are impacted by reductions in force.  The employees that we are no longer able
to employ are very appreciative of this service.  I would expect that our
veterans would feel the same sense of appreciation should they be offered this
assistance as they re-join civilian life.

Chairman Stutzman and
distinguished members of the subcommittee, we at BAE Systems are proud to be
able to support our fighting men and women, both in combat and in the workplace
when they return to life at home.  Thank you so much for the opportunity to
speak with you today.

PREPARED STATEMENT OF CHRIS R.
STRAW, TEAM QUALITY SERVICES, AUBURN, IN

Team Quality Services

Auburn, IN.

October 13, 2011

Marlin Stutzman

Chairman

Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity

Dear Congressman Stutzman:

Regarding veteran employment issues in Northeast Indiana, I
have a very unique perspective. Being born and raised in Northeast Indiana I am
very aware of the perceptions and beliefs and the regional culture. I am also a
veteran, so I have personal experience in being on that side of the employment
line as a veteran. Lastly, now as a business owner and employer I frequently
deal with employment issues from that side of the table.

I feel that employment issues for veterans in Northeast
Indiana fall into three basic categories; little interaction or presence of
military units in the region, low or unrelated skills/lack of higher education
and finally, uncertainty of availability of the service member.

Little interaction or presence of military units in the
region.
Compare Northeast Indiana with a state like Texas. Texas has many
military bases across the state. These are typically prominent employers and major
players in the community. People may know someone who works at the base. They
certainly know about the base, have maybe been on the base at an open house or
possibly their jobs provide services that support the base, etc. By just the
proximity of the base to the communities, the people are more educated and
familiar with the military and the military personnel on the base. I would also
argue that in many cases the perception of the military is higher among those
people than people who don't have that interaction or proximity.

Without that interaction, people in Northeast Indiana are
left to make their own judgments based on the information they have either
available or presented to them. Unfortunately, these perceptions, in many cases
are through what they see in the news, what has been portrayed by Hollywood or
their own past experiences. Reports have indicated that returning Veterans are
encountering negative employer perceptions that Veterans are rigid, deficient
in education and technological skills, and unstable due to PTSD. In an
Associated Press (Yen, 2008) article describing this study, a Veterans group
spokesperson observed that a “Wacko Vet Myth” is growing among employers — an
unintended negative consequence of years of attention being directed at the
mental health issues of returning Veterans. Perception is reality until shown otherwise.

Low skills/lack of higher education. Many returning
Veterans, particular of college age, have very limited work experience outside
the military. Many of those just out of high school have been delayed going to
college because of deployments and many service members who are members of the
National Guard/Reserves have had to leave college mid-year or mid semester
because they have been called to active duty. This has put many young members
of the armed forces at a distinct disadvantage to their civilian peers. Then,
when they get out of the military, their highly focused skill doesn’t match the
qualifications required by employers in our region.

Uncertainty of availability of the service member. Employers
are very aware of the increase in deployment activity of our service members.
Guard and Reserve personnel are routinely deployed overseas to support the war
on terror. The length of this current campaign has required even multiple
deployments for some personnel. Add to that the knowledge that there doesn't
seem to be an end anywhere on the horizon and employers are reluctant to invest
the time and money into on-boarding a new employee who may or may not be at
work because of a Guard / Reserve commitment. This is especially the case with
high unemployment numbers, the abundance of qualified candidates in the
marketplace and sluggish economy forcing employers to work as lean as possible.
What's an employer to do while the service member is deployed? Is he supposed
to hire a replacement, then lay them off and pay unemployment to them because
you have to keep the service members spot open for them? What would you do?

Now, look at the cumulative picture of all of these points from
the viewpoint of a Northeast Indiana employer with the perceptions and beliefs
typical of this region. Unfortunately, the odds aren't in the favor of the vet.
So how do you overcome these issues? Education, involvement, publicity and
predictability are the things that I feel will help reverse the perceptions and
trends in Northeast Indiana.

Sincerely,

Chris R. Straw

Prepared Statement of LTC Anthony D. Tabler, USA (Ret.),
Senior Business Development Manager, Communications and Force Protection
Systems, ITT Electronic Systems, Fort Wayne, IN

My name is Anthony D. Tabler (Tony), and I am
currently serving as a Senior Business Development Manager in ITT's
Communications and Force Protection Systems business area located in Fort
Wayne, Indiana. 

I graduated from the United States Military Academy
in July 1975.    I spent 22 years in the U.S. Army attaining the rank of rank
of Lieutenant Colonel and retired from the Army in 2001 after which I was hired
by ITT in Fort Wayne.

During my time at ITT I’ve had regular contact with
members of the military to include active Army, National Guard and reservists. 
I have spoken with them at their military places of duty, in the community and
at the Fort Wayne Rescue Mission.  I understand the challenges they face as
they transition from military to civilian life.  I also understand the
challenges they have in finding and keeping a job, and that the challenges of
transitioning from the military is often greater for lower enlisted service
members than for senior military officers such as myself.

I'm clearly not an expert on addressing unemployment
issues for veterans, but I will share my views on what I think can be done to
help decrease the unemployment rate for veterans, National Guard and
reservists.  I will also provide insights on what ITT does in Fort Wayne to
help veterans find and maintain employment.  For sake of simplicity I will only
make reference to veterans through the remainder of this testimony. 

I think it is only fitting to first answer the
question, why do we care about veterans?  My answer would be that veterans and
their family members sacrifice much as they serve our country in time of war
and peace.  Our veterans are willing to give their all to protect the interests
of the nation and allow you and I enjoy the freedoms we have in America.  They
may not fully understand or appreciate how important their job is, but veterans
deserve our care, compassion and help.

Helping
veterans to find employment should start when they transition from their
military units and return to civilian life.  When I transitioned from the
military at Fort Gordon, Georgia, I received guidance and coaching at the Fort
Gordon transition office on how to write a resume, and how to best describe my
skills and capabilities in a way that the civilian sector would understand.  Transitioning
for me was easy because I was a Lieutenant Colonel, member of the Army's
acquisition corps, had a masters degree in electrical engineering and many
contacts in the defense companies who offered to help me get a job in their
respective companies.  My rank, job skills and degree made it easy for me to
transition but this is not the case for the younger veterans.  Every veteran,
however, possesses valuable skills that can add tremendous value to any
community.  Some possess detailed technical skills, while all possess
leadership skills that will serve them well in every job profession that I can
think of.

The excitement of leaving the military quickly fades
when the veteran arrives at his hometown and they try to figure out what they
want to do as a civilian.  I believe it is important for the veteran to be able
to visit, for lack of better words, a civilian in-processing center that
provides an opportunity for them take a job aptitude test to determine the type
of work they would best be suited for.  I'm not sure where this would occur but
it potentially could be conducted at an existing Veterans Affairs facility.  I
would compare this to a student taking a college aptitude test to determine
which career field is the best match for them.  During this civilian
in-processing, the veteran should be given assistance in developing a resume
that allows them to match their skills against job opportunities in the
community.  I found that writing and rewriting my resume really forced me to
think about what I wanted to do when I departed the military.  The veterans
should also be coached on how to dress and participate in a job interview.  I
would highly recommend that a case worker be assigned for those who want and
need extra help.  It would also be of tremendous value if the civilian
in-processing facility had a current listing of military friendly businesses
and job opportunities in the community. 

With regard to military friendly businesses, I
believe that offering some type of tax credit to companies who hire veterans
would encourage them to be military friendly and make it appealing for them to
hire veterans.

Once the veteran finds a job I believe it is
important to offer them a military friendly place they can periodically visit
that helps them get and stay connected to the community.  This could
potentially take place at Veterans Affairs or National Guard facilities,
American Legion Posts, Veterans of Foreign Wars Posts or Disabled American
Veterans Chapters or places of worship.  This would give veterans a place to
congregate to talk about what is happening in their lives.  This would also be
a great opportunity for caring professionals in the community to speak with and
mentor veterans on topics of concern.  I am sure that professionals in the
community would be willing to donate their time, offer free seminars or lead
discussion groups on topics that educate and benefit veterans if they knew
there was a need.

I would like to mention one other aspect of
transitioning from the military.  Places of worship should be encouraged to
reach out to the military and their families.  Many veterans, especially those
returning from war, have serious emotional issues that they need to deal with. 
Their families suffer and often do not know where to turn for help.  Places of
worship should not try to deal with serious emotional and mental issues, but
there is no substitute for a caring person coming along side another to deal
with the struggles of life.  Places of worship need to become better educated
in the area of veteran issues and develop creative ways to reach out to
veterans and their families. 

I would now like to share some ideas on things that
ITT is doing to recognize and care for our veterans. 

ITT in Fort Wayne hires veterans in the course of
our normal recruiting activities.  Although we do not have a formally
documented program that we follow to hire veterans, we do include veteran
friendly organizations in our normal recruiting outreach.  For example we
target Navy veterans for our Fleet Systems Engineering Team (FSET) and Army
veterans for our Field Services Representative (FSR) positions.  We e-mail FSET
job openings to NAVNET for posting on their communications board.  
We also post to www.recruitmilitary.com
and www.vetjobs.com.  We also periodically
attend Recruit Military career fairs and place advertisements in the Search and
Employ Quarterly Magazine sponsored by Recruit Military.   

Our employment records indicate that 83 ITT
employees have self-identified themselves as U.S. veterans in Fort Wayne.  This
count is likely low because some employees elect not to identify veteran status
when they are hired. 

The web site www.Indeed.com scrapes our Geospatial
Systems website daily and posts job listings to numerous websites that provide
focus for veterans seeking jobs.  In addition, we post to Monster (Monster
has military.com) and LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com)
which is a business-related social networking site in an effort to target
veterans.

In Fort Wayne ITT is also a member of the Northeast
Indiana Defense Industry Association (NIDIA) whose two fold mission is to
support and grow the defense industry in NE Indiana (serving as a model statewide now) and to grow talent for the defense industry.  This group also focuses
on the employment of veterans.  It is not uncommon for members of this group to
share resumes of veterans between member companies.

ITT also is a member of the Employer Support of the
Guard and Reserve (ESGR).  The mission of the ESGR is to "develop and promote
employer support for Guard and Reserve service by advocating relevant
initiatives, recognizing outstanding support, increasing awareness of
applicable laws, and resolving conflict between employers and service
members.”  ITT has received the ESGR Patriot Award in recognition of being an
outstanding employer who supports members of the National Guard and Reserves. 

ITT also participates in the newly founded Fort Wayne
Base Community Council which supports the Guard and Reserve in Northeast
Indiana.  The Fort Wayne community has recognized this as important and has
reached out to the Selfridge Air National Guard Base who has an established
program in Michigan to help coach the establishment of our group.

Although I have made just a few brief comments, I
hope that I have sparked a few ideas that will result in ways that could help
reduce the unemployment rate of veterans, National Guard and reservists. 

I appreciate the opportunity to testify before this
subcommittee and would be glad to be of service in the future.  I'd be glad to
take any questions at this time.

Prepared Statement of Mark W. Everson, Commissioner, Indiana
Department of Workforce Development, Indianapolis, IN

Introduction

Mr. Chairman and Ranking Member Braley, I appreciate the
opportunity to appear before you to discuss veteran employment issues in the state
of Indiana.  Providing employment and training services to veterans is among
the highest priorities of the Department of Workforce Development in Indiana,
where the U.S. Census Bureau has estimated that just below 10 percent of the adult
population are veterans, with over half of those between the ages of 18 and 65. 
My testimony will provide a brief overview of Indiana’s economy and employment
outlook, and a summary of Indiana’s workforce investment system and programs. 
I will also provide data regarding the characteristics of Indiana’s veterans
and share a summary of the employment and training programs made available to
veterans around the state, and specifically in northeast Indiana.

Indiana Economic Profile

Indiana's labor force is approximately 3.1 million, down
from just over 3.2 million in the summer of 2007.   The state's unemployment
rate peaked in June 2009 at 10.9 percent. Since that time, the unemployment rate has
fallen to just below 9.0 percent.

In January 2010, over 271,000 Hoosiers collected unemployment
insurance benefits from either state or federal programs.  Since that date, the
number of Hoosiers collecting benefits has declined to approximately 115,000 at
present. 

Private sector employment in Indiana is estimated at 2.4
million jobs. Significant sectors include manufacturing (19.0 percent of private
employment), along with private education and health services (18.3 percent), trade
(17.4 percent), and professional and business services (11.7 percent). The importance of
manufacturing to the state's economy is hard to overstate because of
historically high wages in the sector.  The government sector employs over 400,000
Hoosiers.

Employment projections for the state indicate that
employment opportunities in the future will be found in health care,
transportation, and professional, scientific and technical areas.  Indiana will
need to continue to develop a skilled workforce to meet the demands of
employers.

Northeast Indiana Economic Profile

DWD defines northeast Indiana (Economic Growth Region 3) as
the geographic area including the following counties:  Adams, Allen, DeKalb,
Grant, Huntington, LaGrange, Noble, Steuben, Wabash, Wells, and Whitley.  It is
home to nearly 364,000 workers.  The primary employment sectors within northeast
Indiana are manufacturing (including the defense industry), private education
and health services, professional and business services, trade, and agriculture. 

Northeast Indiana's economy has been historically
characterized by a relatively large number of high-paying manufacturing jobs. 
As has been seen in many parts of the United States, northeast Indiana was
significantly impacted by the loss of a number of these jobs.  However, over
the last year, northeast Indiana has seen an uptick in its overall employment
outlook.  The unemployment rate for the region has decreased by nearly two
percentage points to 8.9 percent, and employers have slowly begun to increase employment
numbers.  Current employment projections for the area indicate that both short
and long term employment opportunities will be found in a range of
manufacturing-related occupations (due primarily to retirements) and in health
care.  The area also has potential growth in sectors such as business and
financial services, transportation and material moving, and construction
occupations.  DWD and its WorkOne centers recognize the need to develop a
skilled workforce in northeast Indiana that can meet the demands of these
growing sectors.

Indiana Veterans

The American Community Survey (ACS) is an ongoing
statistical survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau.  The information gathered
includes employment status, income, veteran status, education level, and disability
information.  For 2010, ACS estimates Indiana is home to approximately 469,600
veterans, or nearly 10 percent of its adult population.  However, almost 200,000
Indiana veterans are over 65 and generally not in the workforce. Veterans ages
18 to 65 years total approximately 276,600.  Veterans between the ages of 18
and 34 total approximately 30,500; between the ages of 35 and 54 total
approximately 126,800; and between the ages of 55 and 64 total approximately
119,300.  94.4 percent of Indiana’s veterans are male and 5.6 percent are female.

According to ACS, the 2010 unemployment rate among Indiana's
veterans was 12.4 percent, compared with the total state unemployment rate of 10.7
percent
during the same time period.  There are approximately 3,300 veterans collecting
benefits at present. Almost 12,000 veterans have collected benefits over the
past twelve months. 

The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) recently conducted
a survey that indicated, among other findings, that the unemployment rate of
Gulf War II era veterans 18 years or older in the State of Indiana was 23.6
percent. 
Beyond the overall results of this survey, BLS has not provided any information
on the survey's methodology nor the specific data that were collected.  DWD
believes this figure is overstated.  It is our view that unemployment among
these veterans is somewhat but not dramatically higher than that of the
workforce as a whole.

Additionally, ACS indicates that the education level of
Indiana's veterans tends to be higher than that of civilians, with the exception
of those that have obtained a bachelor's degree or higher.  18.7 percent of Indiana's
veterans have obtained a bachelor's degree or higher, compared with 23.2 percent of
the non-veteran population.  In addition, according to ACS, in 2010 a smaller
percentage of Indiana's veterans (7.4 percent) lived below the poverty level than the
non-veteran population (13.8 percent), but a higher percentage of Indiana's veterans
had a disability (26.1 percent) than the non-veteran population (14.3 percent).

Indiana Workforce Investment System and Programs

DWD is the state agency that oversees and manages
unemployment insurance compensation and federally-funded employment and
training programs in Indiana.  DWD manages federally-funded Workforce
Investment Act, Wagner-Peyser Act, Trade Adjustment Assistance, Adult
Education, and Veterans Employment and Training programs.  DWD receives 100
percent of
the budget for its education and training programs from federal funds made
available through the United States Department of Labor Employment and Training
Administration, with the exception of the Adult Education program, for which we
receive both state and federal funds.

Like all other states, Indiana is divided into a number of
local service areas, which provide federally-funded employment and training
services through a network of One-Stops (called WorkOne centers in Indiana).  There
are twelve local service areas, operating within 11 economic growth regions,
and 90 WorkOne centers throughout the regions.

Each of the local service areas is governed by a workforce
board, comprised of local business leaders, economic development professionals,
labor and education representatives, and other community-based organization
leaders.  These boards hire staff and service-provider organizations to manage
the WorkOne centers and to offer workforce investment services in collaboration
with the staff of DWD.

All customers who visit a WorkOne center are offered access
to services that assist them in gaining the skills necessary to become
reemployed at a self-sufficient level, and will provide the customer with
support throughout his or her period of unemployment.  Specifically, WorkOne centers
provide customers with access to unemployment insurance compensation, case
management and career counseling, job search assistance, skill-building
workshops, short and long-term training, as well as other supportive services. 
All enrolled WorkOne customers are placed into one of two tracks:  the
job-to-job track, where staff provide the customer with reemployment
assistance; or the job-to-training-to-job track, where it is determined that
the client needs additional training in order to become employed at a
self-sufficient level. 

DWD also places a high emphasis on making on-the-job
training available to eligible, unemployed workers.  Through on-the-job
training, an unemployed worker is hired by an employer, and provided training
on the specific skills needed to successfully perform the job.  Since 2009, DWD
has invested nearly $6 million in on-the-job training, based on the belief that
it is beneficial to both of its primary customers: unemployed individuals and employers.
 Unemployed individuals are provided with a job and the opportunity to learn
new skills and employers are reimbursed for up to 50 percent of the participant’s
wages over a six month period in order to compensate for training costs.  

In addition to the services made available to unemployed
customers, WorkOne centers also offer a number of services to local employers,
including job matching, job profiling, management of large hiring events,
information regarding employment-based tax credits, and on-the-job training
funds as just indicated.   DWD provides annual funds which support a number of
business services staff, who are responsible for connecting with local employers
and providing them with no-cost, workforce services.

Indiana Veteran Employment and Training Services

Indiana is committed to providing quality employment
services to veterans at its WorkOne centers.  Veterans receive priority service,
and most of the centers have an on-site veteran specialist who assists with
employment needs.  DWD currently receives funding to employ sixty-two Veteran
Employment and Training staff throughout Indiana.  Thirty-four of these
positions are Local Veteran Employment Representatives (LVER) and twenty-eight
of these positions are Disabled Veteran Outreach Program Specialists (DVOP).  All
of the LVERs are required to be veterans and DVOPs must be veterans with a
service-connected disability.

Services that are provided to eligible veterans at WorkOne centers
include:

  • Orientation to IndianaCAREERConnect.com, the State’s
    largest jobs-board;
  • Assistance looking for a job, developing a resume,
    and preparing for an interview;
  • Direct referral to jobs;
  • Referral to other federal, state and local agencies (as
    appropriate to their self-sufficiency needs);
  • Assistance transitioning into civilian employment;
  • Training incentives and grants; 
  • Guidance finding vocational training; 
  • Post-employment counseling; and 
  • Occupational skills assessment.

In order to ensure that veterans receive access to
skill-building activities and training, DWD has pursued a number of special
employment and training grants.  Indiana was awarded and is currently managing
a special Veterans Workforce Investment Program Grant.  This United States
Department of Labor grant of $500,000, which was supplemented with $250,000
from DWD, is designed to provide training that results in industry-recognized
certifications to veterans with service-connected disabilities, veterans that
have significant barriers to employment, and all recently separated veterans. 
Additionally, for all training programs overseen and managed by DWD, eligible
veterans are provided with priority of service.  This priority ensures that
veterans are provided with first access to skill-building training when funds
or available training slots are limited.

Additionally, DWD ensures that veterans are provided with
priority of service in its job matching program.  Veterans are provided with
first access to open positions posted on IndianaCareerConnect.com; the open
positions are held for twenty-four hours, allowing only qualified veterans to
apply.

DWD recognizes the barriers that returning veterans face
when attempting to access services, locate suitable employment, and reenter the
civilian workforce.  In order to assist returning veterans in accessing
services, DWD has positioned a LVER at Camp Atterbury to assist demobilizing
National Guard and Reserve personnel. This LVER provides service members with
employment information during their demobilization.  In addition, the LVER
collects individual employment information, and then provides it to the service
member's state employment agency. DWD also continues to support the National
Guard Yellow Ribbon Transition Programs around the State and at the two
National Guard Air Bases.  Although demobilizations have decreased in their
frequency and size, DWD remains committed to providing employment services to
this program. Since January 2010, several thousand soldiers and airman have
received employment information through Camp Atterbury and/or participated in a
Yellow Ribbon Program.

Finally, in order to assist veterans with locating suitable
employment, DWD has supported and managed several career fairs specifically
targeted to veterans.  In April 2011, DWD sponsored “Operation Hire a Hoosier
Veteran" career fair in Central Indiana.  Over 100 employers and vendors
participated in this career fair, and several hundred Indiana veterans attended
the fair and had the opportunity to network with employers, submit resumes and
applications for job openings, interview for positions, and attend
skill-building workshops offered by DWD staff.  

From July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011, over 20,000 veterans
were provided with employment and training services in the state of Indiana
through WorkOne centers.

Northeast Indiana Veteran Employment and Training
Services

Approximately 32,000 veterans, age 18 to 65, live in northeast
Indiana, representing nearly 12 percent of Indiana's working-age veterans.  This
number continues to grow as veterans return from Iraq and Afghanistan.  There
is a great need to ensure veterans in the region receive job training
opportunities that will help them develop the skills required to find civilian
employment. 

Over the past year, WorkOne offices in northeast Indiana
have conducted a comprehensive outreach campaign to veterans and
veteran-serving organizations in the region.  This campaign has had a singular
mission: to increase the number of veterans engaged in workforce services.  Activities
included outreach efforts at Veteran's Administration locations that provided
on-site delivery of a wide range of job-search workshops (resume writing,
interview skills, and online job searches); outreach efforts to regional
homeless facilities, including the Fort Wayne Rescue Mission; and monthly
outreach efforts to regional veteran's organizations (VFW, American Legion, and
others) to ensure that the veterans community is prepared to identify and refer
veterans in need of assistance to WorkOne Northeast for services.

Additionally, a military career fair was recently held in northeast
Indiana that focused on supporting reservists/guardsmen and veterans.  At this
event, a dozen human resources professionals from regional employers were
brought together to share information about available job openings and to offer
advice and instruction to veterans in attendance on the best ways to access
these opportunities.  This event had the full support of the Wing Commander and
his staff and will be replicated in other events.

In the past year, WorkOne centers in northeast Indiana provided
employment and training services to approximately 3,000 veterans. 
Significantly, nearly 25 percent of these veterans received training to improve their
technical skills, and increase their prospects for gainful employment.  Also,
during the same time period, veterans served through the WorkOne Northeast centers
received approximately 5,000 referrals for potential employment, and were
provided with career counseling support by WorkOne staff on approximately 2,000
occasions.  The focus of this career counseling has been to help veterans
understand and appreciate the transferability of their military skill sets to
the civilian labor market. 

Northeast Indiana meets or exceeds performance targets
established for Veterans Employment and Training programs by the United States
Department of Labor.  During the current program year, WorkOne centers in northeast
Indiana exceeded nearly all of their performance targets.  For example, the
Consolidate Veteran Entered Employment Rate was 61 percent, which exceeded the target
by 11 percent, and the Consolidated Veterans Average Earnings was $30,060 annually.

Challenges Affecting Veteran Employment Opportunities

DWD believes that there are four primary challenges veterans
encounter regarding employment opportunities.  First, veterans have
predominantly been employed in industries among the hardest hit by the economic
recession.  According to a report issued by the U.S. Congress Joint Economic
Committee Chairman's staff on May 2011, post- 9/11 veterans were more likely
than non-veterans to have been employed in manufacturing, construction,
transportation, and other industries that experienced significant job losses
during 2008 and 2009.  DWD agrees with this finding. Veterans continue to
struggle with securing gainful employment, especially in the manufacturing
sector, which is down about 18 percent from its peak employment in 2007.  While
veterans from the Guard or Reserves receive statutory protection to retain
their pre-deployment position upon completion of their deployment, if an employer's
workforce has been downsized due to layoffs, the returning veteran may not
always find a job upon return.

The second challenge deals with the skills veterans develop
while serving in the military and their ability to translate those skills into
private sector employment.  DWD has found that some of the skills veterans
develop do not always directly correlate to certifications and credentials
often required for private employment.  For example, a veteran may have
operated heavy equipment and vehicles during his or her service, but does not
hold a commercial drivers license that is often a requirement for operating
heavy transportation vehicles in private sector employment.  Additionally, DWD has
found that many veterans experience difficulty expressing what specific skills
they acquired throughout their service, and how those skills transfer to the
requirements of private sector job openings.  Many veterans are modest about
their service, and particularly the skills and aptitudes they developed while
serving.  Although a veteran may have developed and utilized essential job
skills, his or her inability to relate those skills to the requirements of a
job opening can lead a hiring manager to not fully appreciate the skills a
veteran has to offer.

Third, while a veteran is deployed overseas, a number of facets
of his or her home life may have changed.  Some of these changes can include
the birth of a child, the loss of a family member, or even the dissolution of a
marriage.  In addition, returning veterans may need to locate a place to live,
establish bank accounts, locate transportation, and complete many other daily
activities for which they may not have been responsible during their service. These
factors often complicate the job search process, which may be given less initial
priority by the veteran.

Finally, there is an increasing number of veterans returning
with some form of a physical or mental disability.  With advances in medical
care, fatalities have declined but an increasing percentage of veterans return
home with a physical disability potentially limiting future employment
opportunities.  In addition, there are incidences of mental health issues,
including Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), among the veteran population
returning from abroad.  In DWD's experience, Indiana's employers have displayed
a great willingness to provide employment opportunities to veterans who have served
the United States.  However, some employers may be somewhat cautious in hiring
veterans due to concerns about how PTSD or other mental health issues may
affect performance in the workplace.

Conclusion

Mr. Chairman, we at the Indiana Department of Workforce
Development, recognize our obligation to veterans and honor their service to
our country.  We will continue to make every resource available to veterans,
ensuring they receive the services needed to best overcome any barriers to
employment opportunities they may face.  

Thank you for allowing me to appear before you today.  I
would be pleased to respond to any questions from members of the Subcommittee.

Prepared Statement of Gary
Tyler, Indiana State Director, Veterans' Employment and Training Service, U.S.
Department of Labor

Chairman Stutzman, Ranking Member Braley, and members of the Committee:

Thank you for the opportunity to testify before the Committee about the work
we are doing at the Department of Labor (DOL or Department) to address the
important issue of decreasing the unemployment rate for Veterans, National
Guard, and Reservists.  We also appreciate the opportunity to discuss the work
we are doing here in Indiana.  With over 500,000 veterans living in the state,
it is critical that we provide them with the services and support they need to
find and obtain good jobs. 

My name is Gary Tyler, and as the Indiana State Director for the Department
of Labor's Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS), I am dedicated to
helping our Veterans and returning Service Members achieve that goal.  I am
accompanied today by Heather Higgins, my Regional Administrator.

VETS proudly serves Veterans and transitioning Service Members by providing
resources and expertise to assist and prepare them to obtain meaningful careers,
maximize their employment opportunities and protect their employment rights.  We
do this through a variety of nationwide programs that are an integral part of
Secretary Solis's vision of “Good Jobs for Everyone.”

I would like to begin by briefly discussing some of these programs along with
other initiatives that assist America's Veterans in getting to or back to work
and then focus specifically on information for Indiana that you requested in
your invitation.

Jobs for Veterans State Grants Program

The first program that I would like to highlight for you is the Jobs for
Veterans State Grants (JVSG) Program.  Under this grant program, the Department
offers employment and training services to eligible Veterans by allocating funds
to State Workforce Agencies in direct proportion to the number of Veterans
seeking employment within their state.  

The Jobs for Veterans State Grants (JVSG) program funds two occupations, the
Disabled Veterans Outreach Program specialist (DVOP) and the Local Veterans
Employment Representatives (LVER). DVOP specialists provide outreach services,
and intensive employment assistance to meet the employment needs of eligible
Veterans.  LVER staff conducts outreach to employers and engages in advocacy
efforts with hiring executives to increase employment opportunities for
Veterans, encourages the hiring of disabled Veterans, and generally assists
Veterans to gain and retain employment.  

Last year, the JVSG provided services to nearly 589,000 Veterans, and 201,000
Veterans found jobs.

Homeless Veterans’ Reintegration Program

To meet the needs of homeless Veterans and help reintegrate them into the
workforce, VETS administers the Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Program (HVRP). 
Through HVRP, the Department provides competitive grants to state and local
workforce investment boards, state agencies, local public agencies, and private
non-profit organizations, including faith-based organizations and neighborhood
partnerships.  HVRP grantees provide an array of services utilizing a holistic
case management approach that directly assists homeless Veterans and provides
training services to help them to successfully transition into the labor
force.  

In Program Year (PY) 2009, over 14,000 homeless Veterans participated in this
program through 96 grants, and 8,470 were placed into employment.  Data for PY
2010 is not yet available, as figures for the 4th quarter are still
being verified.  

Veterans’ Workforce Investment Program

Yet another way the Department is working to help Veterans get back to work
is through the Veterans' Workforce Investment Program (VWIP).  Through VWIP, the
Department awards competitive grants geared toward focused training, re-training
and employment opportunities for recently separated Veterans, Veterans with
service-connected disabilities, Veterans with significant barriers to employment
and Veterans who served on active duty during expeditions or campaigns for which
specific badges were awarded.  These grants are awarded to meet the needs of
employers for qualified workers in high demand industries, particularly those
occupations requiring a license or certification.  The grants also promote the
integration of public, private, and philanthropic organizations with the
workforce system to create synergy and encourage innovative strategies to serve
our Veterans better.

In FY 2009, VWIP was refocused to provide training and employment services in
green energy occupations as envisioned in the Green Jobs Act of 2007. 
Nationwide, there currently are 22 grants serving over 4,000 Veterans in FY
2011.  Here in Indiana, training and placement services have been provided to
approximately 3,000 Veterans statewide through the VWIP program since 2002. 

Transition Assistance Program

Our primary program for assisting individuals with their transition from the
military to the civilian workforce is the Transition Assistance Program (TAP). 
TAP is an interagency program delivered via a partnership involving the
Department of Defense, DOL VETS, the Department of Veterans Affairs, and the
Department of Homeland Security.  VETS provides an employment workshop that is a
comprehensive two and a half day program during which participants are provided
relevant skills and information, such as job search techniques, career
decision-making processes, and current labor market conditions. 

Currently, VETS uses a mix of contractors, VETS Federal staff, DVOPs, and
LVERs as TAP facilitators.  Starting in late 2012, VETS will transition to all
skilled contract facilitators.

As you know, VETS is currently in the process of redesigning and transforming
the TAP employment workshop.  We are creating experiential, effective, and
enduring solutions for a successful transition from military to civilian life
and employment.  The new TAP will be based on established best practices in
career transition. 

Last year, nearly 130,000 transitioning Service Members and spouses attended
a TAP employment workshop given at one of 272 locations world-wide.

Employer Partnerships

VETS is also implementing a new approach to employer outreach that involves
pilot programs and partnerships with the private sector, including the U.S.
Chamber of Commerce and the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM).  These
partnerships are giving us much broader access to employers so that we can
communicate the value of hiring a Veteran and how to access this extraordinary
source of talent.  It also allows us to educate employers about the unique
skills Veterans bring with them based on their military experience.  Connecting
the talent pool with the many companies looking to hire Veterans allows for a
more efficient hiring process for many Veterans and employers.

The Chamber is working to hold 100 hiring fairs exclusively for Veterans,
transitioning Service Members and their spouses. In the partnership, the U.S.
Chamber and its affiliates focus primarily on securing the participation of
employers while the VETS team focuses on obtaining participation by Veterans,
transitioning Service Members and their spouses.

In fact, the Chamber is scheduled to partner with the VETS Indiana Office,
Department of Veterans’ Affairs, Indiana National Guard, Indiana Workforce
Development, and others in the sixth annual "Operation: Hire a Hoosier Vet" career fair at Stout Field, Indiana National Joint Forces Headquarters in
Indianapolis on April 12, 2012. VETS is working with SHRM to identify
opportunities for VETS state managers to meet with local SHRM chapters to
connect Veterans seeking employment with companies who are hiring. For VETS this
is an effective and efficient way to connect employers and Veterans. We are also
working with SHRM in the development of an HR Toolkit that will provide
employers with the methods and procedures to establish a Veteran hiring program
and to hire Veterans.

Indiana Specific Information

In your letter of invitation, you requested certain information about
Veterans in Indiana.   While some specific data is unavailable, we have
nevertheless been certain to provide the most current information available.  As
you know, Indiana operates a Public Labor Exchange primarily funded by the U.S.
Department of Labor to assist all job seekers with their employment needs. 
While it is available to all populations, Veterans are given priority of
service. In Indiana, the Public Labor Exchange is known as the Work One
Employment System of the Indiana Department of Workforce Development (DWD).  The
services and assistance offered at DWD range from employment preparation and
comprehensive employment placement services, to intensive services through a
case management approach for Veterans with special needs.  Moreover, in FY 2011,
DOL has approved funding for 61.5 FTE staff positions to assist Veterans,
divided between DVOPs and LVER staff.

Level of Education of Veterans Seeking Employment Assistance

Over the past year, 26,265 Veterans have received services through DWD.  Of
the total population of Veterans served through the public labor exchange, 988
or 3.76 percent reported less than a high school diploma while 13,624 or 51.8
percent have a high school degree or a GED. The total number of Veterans
reporting achievement of a post-high school degree or certification is 5489, or
20.8 percent.  (See table below.)

Data Element Indiana Percent
Total Number of Vets, Eligibles and Transitioning Servicemembers 26,265  
Total Number of Vets, Eligibles and Transitioning Servicemembers who
were not HS Graduates
988 3.76%
Total Number of Vets, Eligibles and Transitioning Servicemembers who
had a HS degree or GED
13,624 51.8%
Total Number of Vets, Eligibles and Transitioning Servicemembers who
had a Post-Secondary degree or are Certified
5,489 20.8%

Source: U. S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration
Form ETA 9002 A: “Services to Participants” July 1, 2010 through June 30, 2011.

U. S. Department of Labor, and Employment and Training Administration Form ETA
9002 D Services to Participants, April 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011.

Education level is not a required field when registering with the One-Stop
Career Center system; therefore, the breakdown by education level does not equal
the total number of Veterans served.

Average Placement Salary by Level of Education for Veterans

In Indiana, the six month Average Earnings for veterans are: $15,378 or
$30,756 per annum.  The principle source of information for this data element is
the U. S. Department of Labor's Employment and Training Administration ETA 9002
Report, Services to Participants for Program Year Period July 1, 2010 through
June 30, 2011.  While specific placement salary data by education level
are not available, the ETA 9002, Performance Outcomes for Veterans, Eligible
Persons and Transitioning Service Members does provide Average Earnings data.

Length of Unemployment for Veterans by Education Level

The Current Population Survey provides national data about the employment
status of the civilian non-institutional population by educational attainment,
age, sex, race, and Hispanic or Latino and Non-Hispanic ethnicity.  The same
source provides data for unemployed persons by duration of unemployment,
educational attainment, sex, and age as an annual average for the general
population.  However, data for length of unemployment by education level for
Veterans as a separate population is not available.

Rate of Unemployment for Veterans by Education Level

In terms of unemployment rates for the general population, the Local Area
Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) reports a 10.2 % rate for Indiana in 2010. 
Comparatively, the Current Population Survey (CPS)collected by the Census
Bureau for the Bureau of Labor Statistics, shows that the unemployment rate for
Veterans was 9.0% in Indiana on average in 2010. Unemployment rate data by
education level by state is not available. (See table below.)

Data Element Indiana
Unemployment Rates:  
Calendar Year 2010 (LAUS) General Population 10.2%
Calendar Year 2010 (CPS) - Veterans 9.0%

Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics

Number of Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA)
Complaints Filed

VETS is honored to serve our nation's Veterans. One of the agency's top
priorities is to protect the employment rights of service members when called to
serve on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces.  The goal of the USERRA is to
ensure that no member or prospective member of the U.S. Armed forces endures any
disadvantage or discrimination in employment because of their affiliation with
the military, and to secure the reemployment rights of members of the military
after active duty service.

VETS works closely with DOD’s Office of the Assistant Secretary for Reserve
Affairs' Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR) to ensure that service
members are informed on their USERRA rights before and after they are
mobilized.  We conduct continuous USERRA outreach to educate and inform service
members and employers of their rights and responsibilities under the law.

The use of the National Guard and Reserves has increased dramatically in
recent years, with more called to active duty than any other time since the
Korean War.  This has increased the complexity of issues resulting from the
challenges faced by service members and their families due to lengthier and
multiple deployments.  This is true for all service members but because many
National Guard and Reserve Units, in particular, contend with civilian
employment issues, the claims activity post 9-11 has increased dramatically
nationwide. Employers face equal hardships in the reintegration of service
members into the labor force as they deal with lengthy and multiple absences. 

Your invitation asked for the number of USERRA complaints filed in Indiana. 
Below, is the breakdown of complaints filed within the last five years.

Data Element Indiana
USERRA Complaints Field:  
Federal Fiscal Year 2007 32
Federal Fiscal Year 2008 27
Federal Fiscal Year 2009 32
Federal Fiscal Year 2010 25
Federal Fiscal Year 2011 37

Source: USDOL/VETS Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act
Information Management System

Conclusion:

Thank you again for allowing me to testify today and for your tireless
support and commitment to our Nations Veterans.  DOL and VETS look forward to
continuing to work with you and your staff on Veterans' employment initiatives. 
I look forward to responding to your questions.